Jamaica elected to UNWTO leadership positions

first_img 10 Views   no discussions Share Sharing is caring! Tweet Sharecenter_img Share Tourism Minister Edmnd Bartlett. Image via: nationnews.comKINGSTON, Jamaica — Jamaica’s position as a leader in the global tourism arena has been further bolstered after the destination was elected to serve in several key leadership positions within the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) at the weekend. Tourism Minister Edmund Bartlett revealed that “Jamaica has been elected to serve as vice president for the 19th General Assembly of the UNWTO now underway in South Korea and as Jamaica’s representative I will again preside over several sessions of the Assembly. It is an honour for Jamaica to serve in this capacity and our selection further underscores our good standing in the international arena and the confidence our counterparts place in Jamaica as a leader within the tourism industry at the global level.”Bartlett is currently attending the 19th General Assembly, which runs from October 8-14. The minister explained that “Jamaica has previously served as vice president of the General Assembly, with the last occasion being when Jamaica was elected to this post during the 18th session of the General Assembly in Astana, Kazakhstan in October 2009. We look forward to serving in this esteemed role once again.” The tourism minister outlined that Jamaica has also been elected to serve on the Committee of Affiliate Members. Bartlett said, “I am extremely pleased that Jamaica has been elected to serve on the Committee of Affiliate Members as this will give us an opportunity to assist in broadening the membership of the UNWTO internationally. Jamaica is the only member from the Americas region on this global committee and we will use this platform to play our role in increasing wide-scale support for the UNWTO and its policies.”Among the critical meetings in which Bartlett will participate during the General Assembly is the Minister’s Roundtable, the meeting of the Commission for the Americas, as well as the meeting of the UNWTO Executive Council. Jamaica assumed its position on the Executive Council in January 2011 and will remain a member until 2013. Jamaica is one of three representatives of the entire Americas region on the body, which in consultation with the Secretary General deliberates on policies and strategies that affect tourism worldwide before making recommendations to the General Assembly for action.The minister explained that “As a member of the Executive Council, Jamaica will continue to offer strong representation for countries in the Americas and deliberate on tourism issues at the global level. We will also continue our drive to boost UNWTO membership within the region.” Meanwhile, Bartlett also praised The Bahamas which, on being nominated by Jamaica, was elected vice chairman of the Commission for the Americas.Caribbean News Now NewsRegional Jamaica elected to UNWTO leadership positions by: – October 11, 2011last_img read more

These tiny camera lenses can see like an eagle

first_img By Rachael LallensackFeb. 15, 2017 , 2:00 PM These tiny camera lenses can ‘see’ like an eagle Ever wonder what it’s like to have an “eagle eye?” Surgeons and spies alike may soon find out, thanks to a new camera lens that works the same way eagle­—and human—eyes do, despite being no bigger than a grain of salt. With spy gadgets in mind, scientists started working on the microlens a few years ago, but this new version features improvements to the lens’s field of view and focusing ability. Their latest version—cast in plastic with a 3D printer—acts like an eagle eye, they report today in Science Advances. The camera uses four lenses instead of one, each set at different focal lengths and mounted on an image-reading microchip that compiles data from all four lenses into a single image. These microlenses work by mimicking something called foveated vision, which allows many predators to see a wide field of view at low resolution and focus on a single object at high resolution at the same time. Humans can do this because our fovea, a small pit at the back of our eye packed with color-sensing cells called cones, is the only place where light hits the cones directly, which amps up clarity. Eagles have really deep foveae with lots of cones, which is why “eagle eye” is used to describe great vision. But the chip still has some limitations: Its resolution is low, and the chip is too bulky for some kinds of surgery. It also takes several hours to 3D-print each individual lens. But once those limitations are smoothed out, lenses this small could be used to go inside our veins, perhaps, or spy on culprits as supersmall surveillance drones.last_img read more