Chrissie Hyndes New Music Video Inspired By Dogs Love

first_imgChrissie Hynde has released a new music video inspired by the love of a dog.Video: Chrissie Hynde’s ‘You or No One’ Video“We’ve all heard plenty of songs about relationships, both good and bad. But in my personal experience — and that of seemingly everyone I know — the lifetime of devotion that dogs give is incomparable to that of humans,” Chrissie blogged for PETA. “My new music video, which was filmed in Spain, tells a love story between a man and his dog. After seeing the documentary LA Stories: City of Dogs, I told my director, Steve Glashier, that I wanted to make a video for everyone who has ever loved a dog and had their love returned tenfold.“If you were moved by this video, please hug your dog, tell your pooch that you love him or her, and take your canine buddy for a long walk. Every day. Our dogs deserve it.”last_img read more

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Kathy Bates Hosts American Cancer Society Birthday Ball

first_imgThe American Cancer Society presented its annual birthday ball on June 6th during National Cancer Survivors weekend hosted by Academy Award-winner Kathy Bates and a special performance by Katharine McPhee.Kathy Bates and Katharine McPhee attend the American Cancer Society’s Birthday BallCredit/Copyright: Dan SteinbergKathy explained to the crowd about her battle with breast cancer, and enduring a double mastectomy. After fighting for her life and free from Cancer, she learned that she now suffers from Lymphedema. She battles this post cancer complication daily and is an advocate to others of how it is important to understand this disease.Katharine McPhee performs at the American Cancer Society’s Birthday BallCredit/Copyright: Dan SteinbergKatharine McPhee flew in from NYC and had to leave directly back to NYC, but came to support the American Cancer Society. She performed ” Over the Rainbow” and songs from her previous show Smash.Kathy Bates and co- star Gabby Sidibe of American Horror Story attend American Cancer Society’s Birthday BallCredit/Copyright: Dan SteinbergGabby Sidibe of American Horror Story came to support her co-star and good friend Kathy Bates host the Birthday Ball. Event Chair, Michael Miller presented Alana Stewart of the Farrah Fawcett Foundation a memorable portrait for all their charitable efforts at the American Cancer Society’s Birthday Ball. Alana attended with her son Sean Stewart.Guests enjoyed a live auction and dinner provided by the Beverly Hilton. It was a night to celebrate those who have survived, and those who do so much to fight Cancer.last_img read more

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BTIG Celebrates Success of BTIG Charity Day 2018

first_imgBTIG announced today that it plans to donate more than $5 million to hundreds of charities as a result of its annual BTIG Charity Day.The firm hosted over 80 all-star athletes, models, actors, actresses, musicians, journalists, politicians, business leaders and other cultural icons who acted as guest traders on Tuesday, May 8, 2018. Over 300 non-profit organizations will benefit from the 2018 event. Since inception of the event, BTIG has donated more than $45 million to charity.“It was another incredible day at BTIG yesterday. We are thrilled with the record number of celebrity guest traders who volunteered to join us, and humbled by the impressive number of nominated charities, which will benefit from the day,” said Steven Starker, Co-Founder of BTIG. “It is a tremendous honor to have the continued support of institutional trading clients, our celebrity guest traders and employees worldwide.”“For more than a decade, BTIG Charity Day has helped fund meaningful causes through our donations to nominated non-profit organizations,” said Scott Kovalik, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer of BTIG. “We are inspired by the dedication of our celebrity guests and clients worldwide. All of us at the firm look forward to Charity Day as the day we get to give back to so many important child-focused charities.”An impressive group of participating celebrities, each acting as an ambassador for a charity of their choice, joined the firm yesterday. Celebrities who appeared in BTIG’s offices included, Aaron Boone, Adam Klein, Adonal Foyle, Alex Rodriguez, Allie LaForce, Amy Gutierrez, Barry Bonds, Beth Stern, President Bill Clinton, Bill Romanowski, Bobby Valentine, Bode Miller, Bret Hedican, Brian Cashman, Bruce Beck, CC Sabathia, Charles Oakley, Chris Johnson, Chris Long, Chris Snee, Chris Wragge, Chuck Scarborough, Curtis Martin, Damon Bruce, Dave Dravecky, David Cone, David Costabile, David Muir, David Robertson, David Tyree, Dellin Betances, Denis Leary, Didi Gregorius, Dominic West, Dominique Wilkins, Eli Manning, Elisa Donovan, Emmanuel Mudiay, Eric LeGrand, Evan Engram, Gary Cohn, Grant Hill, Hannah Storm, Henrik Lundqvist, Jalen Rose, Janice Huff, Jay Wright, Jeff Capel, Jenny McCarthy, Jeremy Affeldt, Joe Girardi, Joe Namath, John Collins, John Starks, Johnny Velazquez, Justin Tuck, Kelenna Azubuike, Khris Davis, Kristin Davis, Lance Thomas, Lawrence Taylor, Leonard Marshall, Lucy Liu, Ludacris, Mariano Rivera, Mark Farrell, Mark Messier, Michael Bloomberg, Mookie Betts, Nick Mangold, Nicky Hilton, Petra Nemcova, Phil Simms, Ralph Sampson, Roger Goodell, Scott Van Pelt, Shaquille O’Neal, Stephanie Ruhle, Steve Buscemi, Ted Robinson, Terrell Owens, Tim Flannery, Tony Gonzalez, Ubah Hassan, Victor Cruz and Walt Frazier.For more information about BTIG Charity Day, visit www.btigcharityday.com.last_img read more

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Christmas comes in a shoebox for some of Winnipegs underprivileged children and

first_imgAPTN National NewsIn the season of giving a small group of volunteers in Winnipeg are collecting gifts to give to inner city kids.It’s the third year the program has been running.Here’s APTN’s Shaneen Robinson with the story.last_img

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Adam Sandler facing NotYourHollywoodIndian backlash

first_imgAPTN National NewsAdam Sandler, one of America’s highest paid comedians, is now the centre of social media outrage after his Native American cast walked off the set this week.It sparked thousands of tweets followed by a trending hashtag: #NotYourHollywoodIndian.The actors, mainly from the Navajo Nation, quit the big budget film claiming the Adam Sandler co-written script was deeply offensive to Indigenous women and Indigenous culture.APTN’s Jaydon Flett has more.last_img

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Were listening to the story that is being told and our hearts

first_imgShaneen Robinson APTN National NewsIt was an emotional day for the family of Colten Boushie Thursday in a North Battleford, Sask., court.That’s where they heard the details of what happened on the day the 22-year old was shot and killed.A publication ban prohibits broadcasting these details.The accused is 54-year old farmer Gerald Stanley.Stanley is currently in custody waiting on a judge to decide whether he will get bail.Click here for more stories about Colten Boushie.last_img

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StandingRock rallies around journalist Amy Goodman charged with trespassing at protest

first_imgDennis Ward APTN National NewsA number of rallies took place in and around Bismarck, North Dakota Monday.They’re being held in support of journalist Amy Goodman.See related stories: Standing RockThe Democracy Now producer is facing charges related to a September protest at the #StandingRock site over a pipeline on a sacred site of the Sioux Tribe.dward@aptn.calast_img

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Littleknown Family Information Unit ready to help MMIWG families to get information

first_imgKathleen Martens APTN News Anida Ross, the mother of Delaine Copenace, was upset.“I tried requesting autopsy photos but they won’t let me have them,” she told the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Women and Girls in Thunder Bay.“Because they said it belongs to the OPP (Ontario Provincial Police) I said, ‘Yeah, pictures of my daughter belong to you? No, they should belong to me.’”Accessing crime scene images along with autopsy information has emerged as a major sore spot for families, according to testimony at the eight public hearings to date.Some have described tense battles with police and government agencies for official documents as they try to fill in the gaps of what happened to their loved ones.“That’s where we come in,” said Laurie Davies of the Family Information Liaison Unit (FILU) in Edmonton.“We run alongside the national inquiry, and provide support to families in each province and territory,” she said.The units began operating in April 2017. Davies said they can help families get everything from medical reports to death certificates, help them interpret the information, and connect them with counselling to deal with the results.It’s a role Davies, who has travelled to every community in her Alberta territory to make presentations, is relishing.“It’s about building relationships,” she said. “I love the work: interacting with people, making a difference.”But not everyone knows about FILU, which has been quietly humming along while the troubled inquiry limps in the spotlight.That was evident in Saskatoon where the MMIWG rented a major hotel ballroom to advertise FILU services that didn’t see much traffic.“We need all the publicity we can get,” said Dorothy Myo, FILU manager for Saskatchewan, who was on hand to answer questions.Some families learn about FILU through the inquiry. Other times, FILU staff find them.Helen Vriglen, the FILU contact in Nova Scotia, said she introduced herself to the family of Virginia Pictou Noyes following their testimony in Membertou.The Pictous shared how difficult it was to access cross-border information from Maine State Police about the Canadian woman’s disappearance in 1993.Copenace’s mother, Anida Ross, said she’d dearly love to have a copy of the police report that concludes her daughter, Delaine, drowned in Lake of the Woods after going missing in Kenora, Ont., in 2016.“There seems to be a lack of contact between families and police,” said Davis.While unintentional, she said that lack of contact can hurt, confuse, frustrate and anger families.“We can be that bridge they need,” she said, adding families don’t have to participate in the inquiry to make use of FILU services.“Our job is to be non-adversarial and get valid answers why families can’t get the information they need.”Davies said police reports are what families ask for the most – then autopsy results and referrals to health support.“We bring them smudge kits but we’re not counsellors,” said Davies, noting she can refer family members to culturally sensitive workers and Elders.Davies has connected with more than 20 family members so far.“We never tell the families what they need. We try to find out what they need,” she added.Families are under “such great stress,” agreed Myo.“They feel alone when they’re trying to get information. We can access police and government agencies in a way family members can’t to help complete their story.”Myo, who has a social work background, said her office helped more than 20 families prepare for the inquiry hearings in Saskatoon.She said FILU staff were able to translate organizational jargon “into layman’s language” so families could share their stories with important details they wanted to leave on the inquiry record.With some crimes occurring in different provinces or territories, Myo said FILU teams communicate weekly so nothing falls between the cracks.kmartens@aptn.calast_img read more

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Nation to Nation The emergency meeting on the crisis in child welfare

first_imgNation to NationIndigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott began a two-day emergency meeting on child welfare in Ottawa Thursday by saying she was not there to assign blame.“It is about acknowledging the severity and importance of the crisis and determining how each of us can be part of the solution, part of the urgent need for reform, to keep children and families together,” Philpott told the roughly 340 delegates in attendance.The Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) sent its own delegation. It represents 49 First Nations in northern Ontario.NAN Deputy Grand Chief Anna Betty Achneepineskum put the crisis in her territory into perspective on Nation to Nation.“Since I’ve had this file, which hasn’t been long, compared to the crisis regarding our children, I have found out that we have had six children die in care since January 2014. Six children who were in foster care or a group home,” she said.Achneepineskum also pointed out the long-term harm done to children in care.“They are so disconnected from their family and from their community that they are totally lost,” she said.In Ontario, there are nearly 14,000 children in care.However, Ontario has not kept track of which of those are Indigenous children. It plans to do so starting on February 5.Ontario’s Minister of Child and Family Services Michael Coteau said his province is committed to First Nations control of child care.“First Nations communities never released the authority for others to protect or govern over their children,” he said.However, he doesn’t know when that will happen.As well, Nunavut Senator Dennis Patterson appeared on N2N.He talked about a new Senate committee on the Arctic that will start when Parliament resumes next week.Also, he will soon be visiting all 25 communities in Nunavut, to get feedback on everything from food security to oil and gas to development and concerns over the upcoming legalization of marijuana.Patterson said this is being done ahead of Ottawa’s work on a new Arctic policy.“It’s really important that residents of the Arctic have input into the development of this arctic policy by our federal government,” he said.last_img read more

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Bringing his ancestors voices back to life – a conversation with Jeremy

first_imgAngel MooreAPTN News SaturdayImagine listening to recordings of your ancestors that are more than 100 years old.They’re hauntingly, beautiful traditional songs saved on scratchy wax cylinders.When Jeremy Dutcher found his ancestors’ recordings stored as artifacts at the Canadian Museum of History he knew they had to be shared.“For me the whole point was to take it back and not ask for permission and just say, ‘This belongs with the people’,” Dutcher says.Dutcher’s debut album Wolastoqiyik Lintuwakonawa ‘the songs of the people of the beautiful river’ is a medley of his operatic voice and the original recordings of his ancestors.It is recorded entirely in the Wolastoq language, which only has about one hundred fluent speakers left.The album is getting noticed for its musical and historical significance. He was awarded the prestigious Polaris Prize in September.He is grateful for the recognition, and says it is recognition for the work already done.A bonus was he was able to meet his idol Buffy Sainte Marie.“She tweeted about me today,” he says. “She was like go listen to this album.“It was so beautiful just because she’s somebody like I’ve really idolized.”Buffy Sainte Marie has been the trailblazer for Indigenous artists for decades, and Dutcher says he is following her lead.This album is opening doors for conversations about reconciliation and he is working to keep it going.“Is Canada still ready to be engaging in these conversations or have we moved on to talking about trade deals? Are our allies still going to show up?”Dutcher spoke to APTN News at Cape Breton University before he gave a talk at the Mi’kmaq Basque Cultural Exchange conference.“I am a regular person, so it is personal. Being here is to enter the conversation of global indigeneity – there are people all around the world dealing with cultural and linguistic resurgence,” he says.Dutcher believes it is the artist’s job to challenge, provoke and push boundaries.  And two- spirited and queer people have always been at the centre of pushing their culture forward and carrying on important messages in the community.“I’m hoping that being, you know, a big queer, Indigenous body on stage is going to show something and push those conversations forward,” he says.That evening, Dutcher gave a performance in a small church in Sydney, N.S. About 200 people attended, including the Basque delegates.Stephen Augustine, hereditary grand chief on the Mi’kmaq Grand Council, smudges on stage. He says he forgot his speech and introduces Dutcher. They embrace as old friends. The setting is intimate, you forget there is a crowd, and you are visiting friends.(Dutcher, left, and Hereditary Grand Chief on the Mi’kmaq Grand Council  Stephane Augustine. Photo: Angel Moore/APTN)Dutcher refers to Augustine as the “spirit of the trickster” and he plays a few notes on the piano. He has the crowd’s attention.“Think about people my age in communities who have never had water from a tap. In this country, so loan me your heart to me this evening and I’ll give it back,” he says.The church fills with his ancestors songs and suddenly the 100 years is gone and it is like they are in the room.Idoia Arana-Beobide says she has not seen anything this original in Canada for a long time.“He brought the language alive in such a contemporary yet such a respectful traditional way; I’ve never seen anything as magnificent,” she says.She says Dutcher was not just singing, he was praying and the performance was powerful, original and inspiring.Dutcher plans to continue to inspire people.Next year, he is travelling across Canada to perform with symphonies.“For me, injecting this message and what I’m doing in this space and doing it in beauty and love that hopefully has potential to be transformative,” he says.One might say Dutcher is a messenger touched by his ancestors – his wisdom seems beyond his 27 years.“This is the story of human progression, it’s the story of time travel, it’s the story of us,” he says.amoore@aptn.ca@angelharksenlast_img read more

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Economy added 35300 jobs last month unemployment rate up Statistics Canada

first_imgOTTAWA – The Canadian economy continued to churn out more jobs in October even amid forecasts that economic growth is slowing in the second half of the year.Statistics Canada said Friday that the economy added 35,300 jobs in October as the number of full-time positions swelled by 88,700, while part-time employment dropped by 53,400 jobs.“After modest net job gains through the summer, October’s strong result suggest there is still some life left in the economic upswing,” Bank of Montreal chief economist Doug Porter wrote in a report.The gain in jobs came as the unemployment rate increased to 6.3 per cent, up from 6.2 per cent in September, as more young people started looking for work.However, offsetting the jobs report, Statistics Canada also reported a $3.2-billion trade deficit for September, essentially unchanged from the previous month which was revised to a deficit of $3.2 billion compared with an initial estimate of $3.4 billion.The trade deficit came as both exports and imports lost ground for a fourth consecutive month in September as they both dropped 0.3 per cent.CIBC chief economist Avery Shenfeld noted that when both exports and imports fall that typically means both foreign and domestic demand is slowing.“If we look at the numbers for the third quarter, it is clear that exports are going to be a huge drag on growth,” he said.The overall drop in exports came as the motor vehicles and parts sector fell 10.6 per cent, offset in part by a 7.2 per cent increase in exports of energy products. Prices of exports fell 0.6 per cent, while volumes grew 0.3 per cent.On the other side of the equation, imports fell as the electronic and electrical equipment and parts category fell 4.6 per cent and consumer goods fell 1.9 per cent. Prices of imports fell 1.5 per cent, but volumes increased 1.3 per cent.Economists have been predicting that the economy is slowing in the second half of the year after the red-hot pace set in the first six months of 2017.The strong growth to start the year helped prompt the Bank of Canada to raise its key interest rate target twice, but the central bank kept it on hold last month as it also predicted growth would slow.Shenfeld called the jobs report “a bit of an incongruity” amid the other economic data that has been pointing to a slowing of growth in the third quarter.“Every quality measure we typically look at in the employment report was on the side of angels,” he said.Leading the job growth in October was the “other services” category which gained 21,400 positions, while the construction industry gained 18,400 and information, culture and recreation industries added 15,300 jobs.Offsetting those gains, the wholesale and retail trade sector lost 35,900 positions.Regionally, Quebec posted the largest increase with a gain of 18,400 jobs, while Alberta added 11,900. Manitoba added 4,000 jobs and Newfoundland and Labrador rose by 3,400. Saskatchewan lost 4,000 jobs in October.Compared with a year ago, employment was up by 308,100 jobs as the number of full-time jobs increased by 396,800 and the number of part-time positions fell by 88,700.last_img read more

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Higher gas prices help boost retail sales in September

first_imgOTTAWA – Higher gasoline prices helped bump retail sales higher in September, but economists said it appears consumer spending has cooled after a hot start to the year.Statistics Canada said Thursday retail sales edged up 0.1 per cent to $49.1 billion in September, boosted by sales at gasoline stations as prices climbed due to disruptions caused by hurricane Harvey.However, excluding sales in this subsector, retail sales fell 0.2 per cent.“Retail sales are losing steam, but given the sky-high rates of growth that they were tracking, a cooling was inevitable,” CIBC economist Nick Exarhos wrote in a report.Exarhos noted the result fell short of the consensus expectations for gains of closer to one per cent.Overall, sales were up in five of 11 subsectors, representing 52 per cent of retail trade. After removing the effects of price changes, retail sales in volume terms fell 0.6 per cent.Sales at gasoline stations were up 2.6 per cent as prices rose, largely due to higher prices. In volume terms, sales at gasoline stations declined 2.5 per cent.Economists have been predicting the economy would slow in the second half of the year after a strong start to 2017 which saw the Bank of Canada raise its key interest rate twice.However, while the central bank has said that future rate hikes are likely it has struck a more cautious tone about when that may happen, noting that it will be keeping a keen eye on the incoming economic data.TD Bank economist Dina Ignjatovic said the retail sales data was in line with the slowing in economic activity expected by the Bank of Canada.“Consumer spending has been a key driver of economic growth this year and while a more sustainable rate of growth is likely, it should remain a key support going forward,” Ignjatovic wrote.“Indeed, some improvement in retail sales could be in the cards, in line with the uptick in housing market activity and a strong labour market.”last_img read more

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Can Zuckerbergs media blitz take the pressure off Facebook

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – In the wake of a privacy scandal involving a Trump-connected data-mining firm, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg embarked on a rare media mini-blitz in an attempt to take some of the public and political pressure off the social network.But it’s far from clear whether he’s won over U.S. and European authorities, much less the broader public whose status updates provide Facebook with an endless stream of data it uses to sell targeted ads.On Wednesday, the generally reclusive Zuckerberg sat for an interview on CNN and conducted several more with other outlets, addressing reports that Cambridge Analytica purloined the data of more than 50 million Facebook users in order to sway elections. The Trump campaign paid the firm $6 million during the 2016 election, although it has since distanced itself from Cambridge.Zuckerberg apologized for a “major breach of trust,” admitted mistakes and outlined steps to protect users following Cambridge’s data grab.“I am really sorry that happened,” Zuckerberg said on CNN. Facebook has a “responsibility” to protect its users’ data, he added, noting that if it fails, “we don’t deserve to have the opportunity to serve people.”His mea culpa on cable television came a few hours after he acknowledged his company’s mistakes in a Facebook post , but without saying he was sorry.Zuckerberg and Facebook’s No. 2 executive, Sheryl Sandberg, had been quiet since news broke Friday that Cambridge may have used data improperly obtained from roughly 50 million Facebook users to try to sway elections. Cambridge’s clients included Donald Trump’s general-election campaign.Facebook shares have dropped some 8 per cent, lopping about $46 billion off the company’s market value, since the revelations were first published.While several experts said Zuckerberg took an important step with the CNN interview, few were convinced that he put the Cambridge issue behind hm. Zuckerberg’s apology, for instance, seemed rushed and pro forma to Helio Fred Garcia, a crisis-management professor at NYU and Columbia University.“He didn’t acknowledge the harm or potential harm to the affected users,” Garcia said. “I doubt most people realized he was apologizing.”Instead, the Facebook chief pointed to steps the company has already taken, such as a 2014 move to restrict the access outside apps had to user data. (That move came too late to stop Cambridge.) And he laid out a series of technical changes that will further limit the data such apps can collect, pledged to notify users when outsiders misuse their information and said Facebook will “audit” apps that exhibit troubling behaviour.That audit will be a giant undertaking, said David Carroll, a media researcher at the Parsons School of Design in New York — one that he said will likely turn up a vast number of apps that did “troubling, distressing things.”But on other fronts, Zuckerberg carefully hedged otherwise striking remarks.In the CNN interview, for instance, he said he would be “happy” to testify before Congress — but only if it was “the right thing to do.” Zuckerberg went on to note that many other Facebook officials might be more appropriate witnesses depending on what Congress wanted to know.At another point, the Facebook chief seemed to favour regulation for Facebook and other internet giants. At least, that is, the “right” kind of rules, such as ones requiring online political ads to disclose who paid for them. In almost the next breath, however, Zuckerberg steered clear of endorsing a bill that would write such rules into federal law, and instead talked up Facebook’s own voluntary efforts on that front.“They’ll fight tooth and nail to fight being regulated,” said Timothy Carone, a Notre Dame business professor. “In six months we’ll be having the same conversations, and it’s just going to get worse going into the election.”Even Facebook’s plan to let users know about data leaks may put the onus on users to educate themselves. Zuckerberg said Facebook will “build a tool” that lets users see if their information had been impacted by the Cambridge leak, suggesting that the company won’t be notifying people automatically. Facebook took this kind of do-it-yourself approach in the case of Russian election meddling, in contrast to Twitter, which notified users who had been exposed to Russian propaganda on its network.In what has become one of the worst backlashes Facebook has ever seen, politicians in the U.S. and Britain have called for Zuckerberg to explain its data practices in detail. State attorneys general in Massachusetts, New York and New Jersey have opened investigations into the Cambridge mess. And some have rallied to a movement that urges people to delete their Facebook accounts entirely.Sandy Parakilas, who worked in data protection for Facebook in 2011 and 2012, told a U.K. parliamentary committee Wednesday that the company was vigilant about its network security but lax when it came to protecting users’ data.He said personal data including email addresses and in some cases private messages was allowed to leave Facebook servers with no real controls on how the data was used after that.Paul Argenti, a business professor at Dartmouth, said that while Zuckerberg’s comments hit the right notes, they still probably aren’t enough. “The question is, can you really trust Facebook,” he said. “I don’t think that question has been answered.”Cambridge Analytica headquarters in central London was briefly evacuated Thursday as a precaution after a suspicious package was received. Nothing dangerous was found and normal business resumed, police said.___AP reporters Danica Kirka and Gregory Katz in London and Michael Liedtke in San Francisco contributed to this story.last_img read more

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Australian competition regulator gives OK to Saputo deal for Murray Goulburn

first_imgMONTREAL – Australia’s competition regulator has signed off on Quebec dairy giant Saputo Inc.’s proposed purchase of dairy processor Murray Goulburn Co-Operative Co. after the Canadian company agreed to sell a key plant.The regulator had raised concerns the acquisition would give Saputo control of the two largest dairy plants in southwest Victoria and southeast South Australia.Under the deal with the regulator, Saputo will sell Murray Goulburn’s Koroit plant within a specified period to a buyer which will need to be approved by the regulator.The agreement also includes details of transitional milk supply arrangements and independent management for the plant until it is sold.Saputo announced the deal to buy Murray Goulburn in October for $1.3 billion.The deal still requires approval by Murray Goulburn shareholders and Australia’s foreign investment review board.Companies in this story: (TSX:SAP)last_img read more

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Canadians in Silicon Valley reflect on US gun culture in wake of

first_imgWhen Ron Piovesan moved from Toronto to the United States for work in 2001 he never considered the country’s gun culture as a reason to stay home.It was only after he had kids that the relentless headlines about gun violence — like the recent school shooting in Parkland, Fla., that left 17 students dead and this week’s incident at YouTube’s headquarters in San Bruno, Calif. — really started to weigh on him.“These things add up, and I don’t know what the tipping point is, but you get to a point where you think, ‘I don’t want my kids to be scared anymore,’” says the father of two, choking up as he describes how his children have experienced frightening lockdown drills at their elementary school.“It hits you in a much deeper place and a much more profound place when you have kids who are actually in school — and then that problem becomes a lot more real to you.”Still, the 46-year-old tech executive isn’t planning to uproot his family and return to Canada.“For the moment, I’m choosing to stay and try to make a difference in my community,” says Piovesan, who led a successful campaign last year to stop a gun store from opening in San Carlos, Calif., where he lives.It’s a sentiment shared by attorney Dawn Robertson, who moved with her family to San Francisco just over four years ago when her husband Mike Beltzner was hired to work for Pinterest and more recently Facebook.They have not considered moving back to where they previously lived in Toronto, but have become increasingly distressed by the prevalence of shootings in the U.S.“It’s one of those things that even when it happens you still feel like it can’t happen to you,” says Robertson, 41. “But I think certainly since Parkland and most recently with YouTube being close to us, we’re increasingly concerned — as people who can’t vote here — that we’ve got a major public safety issue living here that is suddenly certainly a concern for us and for our children.“It does weigh quite heavily on us. It’s not enough to make us turn around and move but certainly it’s something that does give us pause.”Zoe Kevork, an immigration lawyer and co-president of the Southern California chapter of Canadians Abroad, says gun culture is something that’s frequently overlooked when Canadians consider a move south.“People do think of us as being so similar … we’re right across the border, we watch all the same television, we have so many things in common culturally,” says Kevork.“But you really start to realize there are some significant cultural differences which you probably didn’t expect when you made the move down here.”Kevork, who has lived in the U.S. for 14 years, says she’s still shocked when a mass shooting makes the news, but finds Americans are no longer as shaken as they once were.“I’m happy I still get shocked by it because they’re so acclimatized to it here, it’s just a part of life. The ability to be shocked I think is what makes us Canadian right now,” she says.“We’re a lot more attuned these days to the things that differentiate us as Canadians, whether that’s the gun culture, whether that’s our treatment of refugees or treatment of immigrants generally.”Piovesan says he wouldn’t be surprised if some of the Canadians taking advantage of the great opportunities in Silicon Valley and elsewhere in the U.S., do start to reconsider their options at home.“I do think where a lot of people thought, ‘Oh I’m never going to move back,’ I do think as things appear to get progressively worse in the United States there will be a tipping point for many people where people think it’s not worth it anymore.”last_img read more

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Spill at Trans Mountain station larger than BC government first reported

first_imgKAMLOOPS, B.C. – A spill from Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline late last month was 48 times larger than initially reported, officials said.The spill volume reported from the company’s Darfield station north of Kamloops on May 27 was revised to 4,800 litres from 100 litres, the B.C. Ministry of Environment said Sunday.It said 100 litres is the minimum threshold under the company’s spill reporting obligations, so that’s why the ministry estimated 100 litres at the time.Trans Mountain spokeswoman Ali Hounsell said the company didn’t tell regulators how much medium crude oil escaped at the time of the spill.“Trans Mountain had not provided an estimate of the volume spilled, other than to confirm with regulators that it was over the reportable threshold, until cleanup had sufficiently progressed to a stage where an accurate estimation could be provided,” she said in an email.Following an onsite investigation, she said Trans Mountain has provided the updated volume estimate to regulators.Trans Mountain is in the final stages of completing the cleanup, she said.Under British Columbia’s spill reporting regulation, Trans Mountain was required to report the spill immediately. The regulation says the quantity spilled should be among the information included in that report, “to the extent practical.”The company turned off the pipeline for several hours the day of the spill, which the ministry said came from a leaking flow metre.The spill was contained to the station property and no waterways were affected, the ministry said.Two days later, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the federal government will spend $4.5 billion to buy the Trans Mountain expansion and Kinder Morgan Canada’s core assets.Kinder Morgan had ceased all non-essential spending on the Trans Mountain expansion in April, vowing to cancel it unless it received assurances it can proceed without delays and without undue risk to shareholders by a deadline of May 31.After the federal government’s announcement, the company said work would be restarted soon, with the government funding construction. The sale is expected to close in the second half of the year.last_img read more

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Pipeline company found guilty in 2015 California oil spill

first_imgLOS ANGELES, Calif. – A pipeline company was convicted of nine criminal charges Friday for causing the worst California coastal spill in 25 years, a disaster that blackened popular beaches for miles, killed wildlife and hurt tourism and fishing.A Santa Barbara County jury found Houston-based Plains All American Pipeline guilty of a felony count of failing to properly maintain its pipeline and eight misdemeanour charges, including killing marine mammals and protected sea birds.California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said in a statement that Plains’ actions were not only reckless and irresponsible but also criminal.“Today’s verdict should send a message: if you endanger our environment and wildlife, we will hold you accountable,” he said.Plains said in a statement that the jury didn’t find any knowing misconduct by the company and “accepts full responsibility for the impact of the accident.”“We are committed to doing the right thing,” the company said.The company said its operation of the pipeline met or exceeded legal and industry standards, and believes the jury erred in its verdict on one count where California law allowed a conviction under a standard of negligence.“We intend to fully evaluate and consider all of our legal options with respect to the trial and resulting jury decision,” Plains said.The company is set to be sentenced on Dec. 13. Because it’s a company, and not a person, Plains only faces fines, though it’s unclear how steep the penalties could be.Plains had faced a total of 15 charges for the rupture of a corroded pipeline that sent at least 123,000 gallons (465,000 litres) of crude oil gushing onto Refugio State Beach in Santa Barbara County, northwest of Los Angeles.Plains pleaded not guilty to the charges and accused prosecutors of criminalizing an unfortunate accident.But federal inspectors found that Plains had made several preventable errors, failed to quickly detect the pipeline rupture and responded too slowly as oil flowed toward the ocean.Plains operators working from a Texas control room more than 1,000 miles (1,609 kilometres) away had turned off an alarm that would have signalled a leak and, unaware a spill had occurred, restarted the hemorrhaging line after it had shut down, which only made matters worse, inspectors found.The spill, two weeks shy of Memorial Day, closed beaches with popular campgrounds for two months and put a crimp in the local tourist economy and fishing industry.It also crippled the local oil business because the pipeline was used to transport crude to refineries from seven offshore rigs, including three owned by Exxon Mobil, that have been idle since the spill.Last year, Denver-based Venoco, declared bankruptcy, in part because it wasn’t able to operate its platform. The state is now responsible for plugging and decommissioning Veneco’s wells at an estimated cost of $58 million. That doesn’t include the eventual cost to remove the enormous structure.Plains apologized for the spill and paid for the cleanup. The company’s 2017 annual report estimated costs from the spill at $335 million, not including lost revenues.It is seeking approval to repair or rebuild its corroded pipelines.The company still faces possible fines from the U.S. government and also faces a federal class-action lawsuit by owners of beachfront properties, fishing boat operators, the petroleum industry and oil workers who lost jobs because of the spill.The pipeline that spilled has been shuttered but Plains has applied to build a new one in the same location.Kristen Monsell, oceans legal director with the Center for Biological Diversity, said in a statement that Plains can’t be given “a second chance to spill again.”“It’s time to get dirty, dangerous drilling out of our oceans, out of our coastal areas and out of our state,” she said.___Associated Press writer Brian Melley contributed to this report.last_img read more

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The Latest Pushback on Trumps oil trains rule

first_imgBILLINGS, Mont. — The Latest on the Trump administration’s miscalculation of safety benefits of electronic brakes for oil trains (all times local):12:15 p.m.Supporters of more advanced brakes on trains hauling explosive fuels are pushing back against a Trump administration decision to scrap their mandatory use following the revelation that derailment risks were miscalculated.A senior adviser to Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, Robert Duff, said Thursday that federal officials should reconsider the safety advantages of electronic brakes after The Associated Press found some benefits were ignored.Railroads were required to begin installing the brakes under a 2015 rule prompted by a string of fiery derailments involving oil and ethanol shipments.The AP found that when Trump administration killed the rule in September, it omitted up to $117 million in potential reduced damages from using the brakes.Department of Transportation officials acknowledged the error but said it was unintentional and does not affect the repeal.__12 a.m.The Trump administration miscalculated potential damages from train derailments when it cancelled an Obama-era rule requiring the installation of more advanced brakes by railroads hauling explosive fuels.A government analysis used to justify the cancellation omitted up to $117 million in potential reduced damages from using electronic brakes. The error could stoke criticism from supporters of the rule.Department of Transportation officials acknowledged the error after it was discovered by The Associated Press during a review of federal documents. Still, they said it was unintentional and would not have made a difference.The brake rule was adopted under President Barack Obama following a string of fiery derailments of trains hauling oil and ethanol.The railroad and oil industries have pushed to cancel the rule citing its high costs.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Fatal collision south of Grande Prairie

first_imgGRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – The Grande Prairie Rural RCMP responded to a fatal collision early Sunday on Highway 40.At approximately 12:15 a.m. on February 17, 2019, the RCMP were called to a three-vehicle collision on Highway 40 approximately 20 km south of Grande Prairie.The collision happened near Norboard and involved a jeep and two semi-trucks. The 34-year-old male driver of the jeep was pronounced deceased at the scene. The collision has been cleared, and traffic flow has returned to normal. The investigation is ongoing.last_img read more

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BC announces agreement with legal aid lawyers

first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. – A one-time grant of $7.9 million to support the development of a new framework for legal aid funding was announced by the Province and the Legal Services Society (LSS).$4 million from the government and $3.9 million from LSS will be used to increase payments to legal aid lawyers from April 28, 2019, until Oct. 31, 2019. To ensure lawyers continue to provide legal aid services to those most in need, while the government, LSS and the Association of Legal Aid Lawyers (ALL) negotiate an agreement for long-term, sustainable legal aid funding.“We recognize there is work to be done to improve the legal aid system both for British Columbians and the counsel that represent them in court,” said David Eby, Attorney General. “Legal aid lawyers provide services to some of the most vulnerable members of the province, and we will continue to work with LSS to address the historical underfunding of legal aid.” The foundation will receive the grant and work with government, LSS and ALL to allocate the funding. The Law Foundation of BC is a non-profit foundation with a mandate to fund legal aid and other law-related initiatives.The ALL negotiating team has issued this statement: “We appreciate the recognition by government of the important work our members do for vulnerable British Columbians and look forward to negotiations that will provide a solution to a very much neglected legal aid system.”According to the government, LSS and ALL have also committed to designing a long-term legal aid negotiation framework, paving the way for a smoother negotiating process in the future.This grant is in addition to the $26 million over three years (2018-19 through 2020-21) in increased funding to LSS already announced by the government to support the provision of criminal, family and civil legal aid services shared the government.last_img read more

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