Canadians in Silicon Valley reflect on US gun culture in wake of

first_imgWhen Ron Piovesan moved from Toronto to the United States for work in 2001 he never considered the country’s gun culture as a reason to stay home.It was only after he had kids that the relentless headlines about gun violence — like the recent school shooting in Parkland, Fla., that left 17 students dead and this week’s incident at YouTube’s headquarters in San Bruno, Calif. — really started to weigh on him.“These things add up, and I don’t know what the tipping point is, but you get to a point where you think, ‘I don’t want my kids to be scared anymore,’” says the father of two, choking up as he describes how his children have experienced frightening lockdown drills at their elementary school.“It hits you in a much deeper place and a much more profound place when you have kids who are actually in school — and then that problem becomes a lot more real to you.”Still, the 46-year-old tech executive isn’t planning to uproot his family and return to Canada.“For the moment, I’m choosing to stay and try to make a difference in my community,” says Piovesan, who led a successful campaign last year to stop a gun store from opening in San Carlos, Calif., where he lives.It’s a sentiment shared by attorney Dawn Robertson, who moved with her family to San Francisco just over four years ago when her husband Mike Beltzner was hired to work for Pinterest and more recently Facebook.They have not considered moving back to where they previously lived in Toronto, but have become increasingly distressed by the prevalence of shootings in the U.S.“It’s one of those things that even when it happens you still feel like it can’t happen to you,” says Robertson, 41. “But I think certainly since Parkland and most recently with YouTube being close to us, we’re increasingly concerned — as people who can’t vote here — that we’ve got a major public safety issue living here that is suddenly certainly a concern for us and for our children.“It does weigh quite heavily on us. It’s not enough to make us turn around and move but certainly it’s something that does give us pause.”Zoe Kevork, an immigration lawyer and co-president of the Southern California chapter of Canadians Abroad, says gun culture is something that’s frequently overlooked when Canadians consider a move south.“People do think of us as being so similar … we’re right across the border, we watch all the same television, we have so many things in common culturally,” says Kevork.“But you really start to realize there are some significant cultural differences which you probably didn’t expect when you made the move down here.”Kevork, who has lived in the U.S. for 14 years, says she’s still shocked when a mass shooting makes the news, but finds Americans are no longer as shaken as they once were.“I’m happy I still get shocked by it because they’re so acclimatized to it here, it’s just a part of life. The ability to be shocked I think is what makes us Canadian right now,” she says.“We’re a lot more attuned these days to the things that differentiate us as Canadians, whether that’s the gun culture, whether that’s our treatment of refugees or treatment of immigrants generally.”Piovesan says he wouldn’t be surprised if some of the Canadians taking advantage of the great opportunities in Silicon Valley and elsewhere in the U.S., do start to reconsider their options at home.“I do think where a lot of people thought, ‘Oh I’m never going to move back,’ I do think as things appear to get progressively worse in the United States there will be a tipping point for many people where people think it’s not worth it anymore.”last_img read more

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From the Field Chained to a tree for three months – A

17 August 2011When Istvan Papp awoke on the morning of 7 October last year, he had no way of knowing that he would spend most of the next three months waking up under the open sky, surrounded by camels and chained to a tree near Sudan’s border with Chad. The chain became a regular and central part of the peacekeeper’s daily existence, along with a herd of camels and various trees.“We moved from one place to the other every two or three days. Whenever we moved, first they went to look for a tree for me,” Mr. Papp said. “When they found an appropriate tree, providing shade for the day, they put one end of the chain to the tree, the other end to either my left or right leg.” Despite the conditions he now found himself in, there was some thoughtfulness which Mr. Papp could appreciate.“I always had the choice of which leg I would like to be chained,” he said. “During the day, as the sun was going around, I had to change my place. The chain was about three-metres long, with 96 links it. It gave me freedom of movement, just enough to move as the shade moved.”Given the sudden narrowness of his future prospects, such considerations took on even more weight for Mr. Papp given the unlikelihood of a speedy end to his abduction.“Knowing the area that I was held in and knowing the people, their number and also the kind of weapons they had, I was sure that no successful rescue operation could be conducted. These people were in an area which was out of bounds for the Government and for the police…,” Mr. Papp said. “They were at home, nobody could enter the area without their prior knowledge. They had very good recce, or intelligence. They knew of any movement in the neighbourhood. Interestingly, later on they always stayed with the herd of camels. During the night they were sleeping like anyone else because the camels were the natural guards. You cannot fool them. If anybody wanted to get near us, they alerted, they made noise.”UNAMID personnel mark the location of an unexploded bomb near Shangel Tubaya, North Darfur (2011).Using a mixture of broken French, English, Arabic and body language, Mr. Papp’s abductors conveyed to him that his abduction was purely a business matter and that he would not be mistreated. He was provided with a small carpet and a blanket to sleep with.“When it was very cold, after two weeks or so, they gave me a second one because I was shivering. I ate the same, I drank the same, I felt the same cold as my captors,” the peacekeeper said. “They used to tell me that we are on the same team: ‘our interests are the same’ – basically, they were right.” Mr. Papp had been wearing jeans, a short-sleeve shirt and sandals when he was taken. His clothing was exchanged for a jelabiya – a traditional Arab robe worn locally – while his sandals, which wore out after three weeks of constant shifting to new locations, were replaced with sneakers.“It’s not always as grave as one may think,” he said. “They asked me what’s my shoe size, I said, ‘42-43, in between.’ You won’t imagine what they did: they bought the left one, size 43, and the right one, size 42… It was funny.”But the laughter was tempered. Over time, Mr. Papp’s own mood became dependent on that of his captors.“Your mood changes with their mood. If their discussions with the UN or the Government of Sudan were getting better – that there was a chance of something happening – then they were in a better mood and they were smiling and all that, and my mood was also better because there was hope,” he said. “When they were shouting with each other or quarrelling, then I also had the feeling that something was wrong, so my mood was also down.”Assisted by UNAMID, more than 50 child soldiers march to a voluntary disarmament site in Tura, North Darfur (2010).While efforts to free him were under way far from the blazing sun of the Sudan-Chad border, daily life centred on waiting – and finding ways to fill one’s time while chained to a tree.“We woke up at five, with one or two of them preparing the fireplace, preparing for the morning prayer. Around six o’clock, after they had their prayer, they prepared tea and came to my spot with some. By that time I was up, it was still cold, so I just took the glass of tea under my blankets and drank it. When the sun was up, I had my first chance to walk to the toilet, so I took that opportunity. I returned, set up my place and tidied it and then at around 10 o’clock I got breakfast,” Mr. Papp said.“The main meal was at around three o’clock in the afternoon. I always saved half of my meal for dinner, because I’m used to having three meals… Then, when evening came, I got tea again and I went to bed. That was the daily routine. But every time you had to find something to pass your time. You are just lying down and it’s not good when you start thinking – it’s really not good.UNAMID peacekeepers patrol in West Darfur (2011).“You have to do something physical that takes up your energy, so one way was to make my spot more comfortable, removing the stones from underneath my carpet. I tried to replace them with gravel to make it softer… When we stayed somewhere for two or three days, it was worth the investment to make a wall. Most of the time we were staying in temporary river beds, so I built a small wall, 50 to 60 centimetres high, to block the wind passing through but also to give me extra privacy. Then I was looking for small stones, if I found some that resembled an animal or something, I made a small collection. I found small pieces of wood or dried grass, I placed them parallel to each other, making towers, seeing how high I can make them. Then insects; I found grasshoppers, ants, and I played with them. You can’t imagine how one can think of minor things to pass your time.” But the lighter moments and constant effort to keep occupied were only temporary distractions from the reality of his predicament, especially after the first 40 to 50 days, when Mr. Papp’s kidnappers ended the regular proof of life calls.“Before that, every second day I could talk to the UN, I could tell them I am fine. They asked if I’m healthy, if I’m eating. The UN was calling them so it was no expense to the abductors; it was quite regular. As time passed, they were getting a bit upset that nothing was happening, so one way to put pressure was to cut all communication with me. They kept on saying, ‘Istvan is here, Istvan is fine, but he will be able to talk to you only if you give us something substantive and not only ask about Istvan’s health, and is he eating or drinking,’ – they were looking for something else,” Mr. Papp said.Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon meets with Istvan Papp at UN Headquarters (2011).All the while, he was conscious of the effects of the kidnapping on his family, friends and colleagues.“I would say this uncertainty hurt them and the UN and the others more because I knew what was happening to me, and I knew that my family is OK, and I also knew that I’m OK – which the others didn’t know. The worst was the last 40 days, when they cut off all communication with me… I wasn’t allowed to give a sign of life.”And as hard as he tried to keep his focus on his immediate predicament, Mr. Papp’s thoughts constantly returned to his family.“No roof, open sky, it’s not that bad – my former military life helped me survive that,” Mr. Papp said. “But, you know, when you are lying on your back and you see the stars in the sky and also the planes flying by, and you think that people sitting on the planes, they have their families, they are going home. Then your memory and your imagination start working…”While the relatively benign treatment from his kidnappers was welcome, not knowing if or when he would ever be released weighed on him. An aerial view over Dali, near Tawila in North Darfur (2011).“They didn’t hurt me – but of course, you have a kind of mental pressure because of the uncertainty. That’s really the hardest, when you don’t know how long you will stay and you don’t know where the discussions are, at which stage – you only know that one day after the other not much is happening,” Mr. Papp said. “They are trying to calm you down by telling you that ‘Istvan, in sha’allah they will pay, you will be free, tomorrow, day after tomorrow…’ which never came. They said at the beginning that if nobody is going to pay for you, we will release you after 30 days. Thirty days came, then they said 60 days. After 60 days I didn’t care about whatever they said. But my release was sudden. I didn’t really expect anything to happen and then…”In early January, three months after he was abducted, Mr. Papp’s captors indicated he would be taken to a hill-top, not far from the Sudanese capital of Khartoum, where he would be handed over to representatives of the Sudanese Government. After hours of driving to the hand-over point, he was shepherded into a helicopter bound for El Fasher – and asked what size pants he wore.“I wasn’t really sure of my safe release until I arrived in El Fasher because when I arrived at this hilltop – you don’t know whether it’s a set-up or whatever… when the helicopter landed me in El Fasher, I saw the [UNAMID] Deputy Joint Special Representative, Mr. [Mohamed] Yonis, the chief medical doctor and two or three friends from the UN and also the wali [governor] was there and some of the military and other friends, also from the Sudanese side, and then I realized that I’m OK – I’m safe,” the peacekeeper said.Following his release, Istvan Papp speaks to journalists on his arrival in El Fasher (2011). Reuters/Mohamed Nureldin AbdallahChanging into government-provided clean clothes on the helicopter’s arrival in El Fasher and after a brief encounter with the media, UNAMID staffers took Mr. Papp away for an initial medical check-up and de-briefing. He then boarded a government-organized flight to Khartoum, where – after another encounter with the media – he met Sudan’s Vice-President, Ali Osman Taha, before being taken to a hospital for a full medical check-up. That night was spent in a hotel in Khartoum and the following day, 6 January, the Hungarian Ambassador to Egypt and Sudan accompanied him on a flight to Cairo, from where he travelled, along with an escort from the Hungarian Government, to Budapest.“I was crying, I have to admit. I’m a military fellow, but I had tears in my eyes when I stepped on Hungarian soil,” he said. “And I did the same thing that I did in El Fasher and in Khartoum: I touched the ground with my forehead. ‘That’s the motherland, I am home.’ That was really the point when I knew I am back at home, I am free.” Whisked to a location away from the airport, Mr. Papp was reunited with his family – his wife and two children – before being brought before waiting journalists. The media awaiting Mr. Papp were a preview of what he could expect in coming days as news of his release spread.“Not too many Hungarians have been abducted, so it was something new… and what I learned the day after, when I was at home and I went to a shopping centre, meeting with people, was that the media throughout the three months had kept the public very much up-to-date. They had been releasing information on me, people did recognize me and I could feel that my case was something that united Hungarians, which is not so easy to do,” he said. Instead of shunning the media attention as an intrusion, Mr. Papp took it in his stride, even seeing how it could help his own recovery.“First, this is something that you cannot avoid. Regarding the media, it is better to talk to them than to close your door and shut your mouth. That’s even worse. The second thing is the psychological effect. The best way to cure yourself is to talk it out. Even if you have to repeat it 10, 15, 20 times, with the same words or different words, the story is the same basically, but talk it out. Don’t keep it inside. The media helped a lot,” Mr. Papp said.Having been the first UN disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration officer on the ground in Darfur, coupled with his desire to stay active following his retirement from the Hungarian Armed Forces, Mr. Papp was keen to return to his work there but was unable to do so due to security considerations. Istvan Papp with Haitian colleagues in his office at MINUSTAH, where he now works on disarmament issues.After some rest, he was deployed earlier this year to another peacekeeping operation, the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH). He said returning to the field did not pose any problem for him, especially knowing that while he was bound to a tree in Darfur, his plight was not forgotten – a fact driven home during his visit to UN Headquarters in New York in early March.“You know, you don’t think these high-ranking guys would like to see you or anything. Yes, I was sure that they knew from daily reports that something had happened… but it was really coming from the heart that the Under-Secretary-General of the Department of Safety and Security, the Under-Secretary-General of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations and then the Secretary-General spared time to see me and my wife – and it’s not a one-minute courtesy thing just to shake hands, I could see from small things that they did get prepared to meet me, like they pronounced my name properly, they knew my background,” Mr. Papp said. Some of their questions were similar to the questions he has been fielding since his release, and Mr. Papp expects the questions to continue.“The question that is put to me most of the time is ‘How do you feel to be a hero?’ Well, I’m not. I’m not a hero. I’m a peacekeeper who was lucky enough to have had a good negotiating team both in the UN, reinforced by a small Hungarian team, and with the Sudanese, and who was freed,” Mr. Papp said. “My job was only to have some stamina and, as I always used to say, a love of life. That was my job: to stay alive. And the rest was, thank God, done by the others. It’s not so easy to stay alive – but it’s also not easy to die just like that.” On that Thursday, the UN civilian peacekeeper had gone about his work with the United Nations-African Union peacekeeping mission in Darfur (UNAMID) – where he oversaw its programme for the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration of former combatants – and returned in the evening to the house he shared with four colleagues in El Fasher, the capital of North Darfur state in Sudan. As he had on previous nights over the past year and a half, Mr. Papp was about to head to the house’s roof-top from where he would call his family in Hungary, when everything changed.“I was in the corridor, just in front of my room when I saw someone standing in the hall with a machine gun and shouting at us, having all of us go into one room and they tied us up there,” Mr. Papp said.An unknown number of armed men had broken in to the residence. The 55-year-old was no stranger to the dangers of serving in remote locations. Throughout his 31 years of service with the Hungarian armed forces, as well as after his retirement in 2005, he served in various peacekeeping operations – both UN and non-UN – in Iraq, Iran, the Sinai peninsula, Mozambique, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Nepal, and also spent several years as a desk officer with the Department of Peacekeeping Operations at UN Headquarters in New York. Along with peacekeeping colleagues, Istvan Papp takes part in a child soldier release exercise in the village of Kafod, North Darfur (2010).To some degree, his training had prepared him for what was happening. But, looking back on his ordeal some months after it ended, Mr. Papp was keen to stress that despite the training, nothing quite prepares one in such circumstances.“It’s like a fairy tale, it cannot be. It’s like a joke: ‘What’s going on?!’ You don’t believe it’s happening to you. You don’t really realize what’s up,” he said.The butt of a machine gun being slammed into his kidneys helped him realize just how serious his situation was that windy Thursday night.Along with a Serbian housemate, he was taken at gunpoint to a UN vehicle parked outside the house. With one of their abductors at the wheel and others in passenger seats, they drove off. Taking advantage of a momentary distraction, Mr. Papp’s housemate managed to escape from the unlocked vehicle. It was a different story for Mr. Papp, bound in the back of the 4WD.“In one way, I was happy that he left because at least he could raise the alarm. He could do something that could also help me,” Mr. Papp said. “But I was tied up, I was thrown in the back of the vehicle. I had no chance…”Of the other house-mates, two were taken in another vehicle but, being accompanied by fewer abductors, they managed to escape. The fifth house-mate had escaped detection during the break-in. The UN vehicle carrying Mr. Papp was abandoned in El Fasher. He was transferred to another two vehicles – with the last transfer site near the UNAMID compound – before finally speeding off into the night, towards the border with Chad, around 400 kilometres from El Fasher.It was on that long drive, as the shock of what had happened wore off, that the gravity of Mr. Papp’s current circumstances sank in.Istvan Papp outside of an UNAMID armoured personnel carrier during a stop on the way to the village of Tura, 40 kilometres outside of El Fasher, North Darfur (2010).“You don’t really think, in the first hours, about what is happening. You just obey and you do what you are told. I had read the UN brochure on how to behave during abductions and all that… you recall slowly that you better wait – they haven’t killed you and that’s a good sign,” Mr. Papp said.This was further confirmed when, a day or two after his abduction, his kidnappers organized a satellite telephone call to Radio Dabanga – an independent, Netherlands-based radio outlet covering events in Darfur – which was Mr. Papp’s first opportunity to give proof of life, the term used to indicate that a kidnap victim is still alive.“That’s when you also hear, for the first time, that they want a ransom. So it means they will feed you, they will provide you with security and all that,” he said. “They told me that my job was to stay healthy, they will provide security, they will feed me, provide me water and everything, plus they will do the negotiations, because that’s their business.”The kidnappers were demanding a ransom of $1 million – however, the UN policy is to not pay ransoms and the responsibility for UN staff security in a peacekeeping area of operations lies primarily in the hands of the local authorities. Initially, Mr. Papp had some degree of personal freedom – but that was not to last. “For the first few days, I was considered to be an old man, and they appreciated that, so I was not chained. I was guarded, but I had a kind of freedom of movement, I could go to the toilet…,” Mr. Papp said. “But after 10 days, when they learned from me that I was former military – I mean, you have to tell them these things, they would get to know of it, so it is better if I tell them – they decided to chain me during the night and after two or three days they decided throughout the day also, so 24 hours a day.” read more

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Ontario creates new corporation to manage public sector pensions begins operations next

TORONTO — Ontario is setting up a new body to pool and manage public sector pensions.The Liberal government announced that the Investment Management Corporation of Ontario was established July 1 and is set to be up and running by next spring.The government says the fund is expected to lower administrative costs and help improve return on investments, but participation will be voluntary for broader public sector organizations.Federal government and provinces — minus Quebec and Manitoba — agree to new CPP dealCPP changes are ‘significant’ for most Canadians’ retirement incomes: economistThe Ontario Pension Board — which administers provincial government employees’ pensions as well as those of workers at government agencies, boards and commissions — and the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board are founding members, with combined investment assets of about $50 billion.A spokeswoman for Finance Minister Charles Sousa says the new corporation “will not require any financial support from the Ontario government or the Ontario taxpayer and will operate at arm’s length from the government as a member-based non-profit corporation.” read more

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Feds receive more warnings over tax proposals as public consultation closes

OTTAWA — With its public outreach winding down, the Trudeau government received fresh warnings Monday from major industry associations about the negative fallout from its controversial tax-reform proposals.Business leaders sent new letters to Ottawa insisting the proposed tax changes, which the Liberals have said are aimed at creating more fairness in the system, will cause considerable collateral damage in the economy.The latest criticisms of Ottawa’s plan to change tax rules for private corporations arrived as the government’s 75-day consultation period on the proposals approached its deadline late Monday.Concerns have poured in from angry Canadians with many different backgrounds, including doctors, farmers, small-business owners and tax planners.Finance Minister Bill Morneau has tried to address the outrage by insisting the government has been listening to the concerns and will make adjustments, if necessary.One message came from a group representing some of the country’s fastest growing technology companies and industry investors. They argued the proposals would restrict the ability of tech entrepreneurs to access capital that’s vital to growing their companies and creating jobs.“It is vital that before any decisions on this file are made, the federal government meets with Canadian innovators to discuss solutions that do not hurt Canada’s job and prosperity creators in the tech sector,” said the letter, signed by CEOs representing entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and angel investors.“This is a race to the bottom, and runs contrary to the government’s innovation and skills plan.”The association said the changes, if implemented, would create uncertainty for corporate tax planning, intensify a brain drain of tech talent away from Canada and negatively affect Ottawa’s highly publicized investments to help high-potential firms scale up.Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters, which represents more than 10,000 companies, also laid out its concerns in a letter sent Monday to Morneau that called the changes “significant but flawed piecemeal amendments.”In the message, president Dennis Darby said the reforms would “strike well beyond their intended target” and could lead to “significant negative unintended consequences” for small manufacturers.The changes, Darby added, would reduce the incentive and economic return from entrepreneurship, risk-taking, business investment and job creation. He also said the proposals would increase business costs, further complicate an already complex tax system and create new areas of unfairness.The government also came under more pressure to extend its consultation, a process that has itself been criticized for being too brief for such a complex set of changes.Both groups urged the federal government to delay the consultation period in order to allow for a broader review of the tax system and to allow for more input from the private sector.Morneau has pitched the changes as a necessary levelling of the playing field for all Canadians, particularly those in the so-called middle class, because they would end tax advantages unfairly exploited by some wealthy business owners.The plan, however, has led to considerable outrage, pushing the Trudeau government into a difficult communications war. Vocal and often organized opponents have argued the changes would hurt Canadians at different income levels and from many different sectors.“We are listening — we’ve heard things that we know are going to be important in our implementation,” Morneau said Monday during question period as he once again faced waves of questions about the proposals from opposition MPs.“As we move forward, we’re going to get this right.”Leaders in several provinces have also complained publicly about the possible consequences of the Liberal plan. On Tuesday, Morneau will discuss his plan face to face with provincial and territorial premiers when they gather in Ottawa.— Follow @AndyBlatchford on Twitter read more

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Brock Film Society kicks off new season with First Reformed

First Reformed, the latest work of acclaimed writer-director Paul Schrader, will open the Brock University Film Society’s fall 2018 season on Thursday, Sept. 20.Best known for works such as Taxi Driver, American Gigolo and Affliction, Schrader will be familiar to students of recently retired Brock Professor Barry Grant, who used Schrader’s piece on film noir as a staple in all four editions of his book Film Genre Reader.First Reformed is a gripping thriller about a crisis of faith that is at once personal, political and planetary.The film centres on Reverend Ernst Toller (Ethan Hawke), a solitary, middle-aged parish pastor at a small Dutch Reformed church in upstate New York. Once a stop on the Underground Railroad, the church is now a tourist attraction catering to a dwindling congregation. When a pregnant parishioner (Amanda Seyfried) asks Rev. Toller to counsel her husband, a radical environmentalist, the clergyman finds himself plunged into his own tormented past and equally despairing future, until he finds redemption in an act of grandiose violence.Exclaim! magazine calls First Reformed “the quintessential Schrader film” that solidifies him “as a true American master.”For more than 40 years, the Department of Communication, Popular Culture and Film has hosted the film society (previously known as a series) to bring some of the best in independent, international and Canadian cinema to St. Catharines.Tickets are available on the evening of screenings at the Film House at the FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre in downtown St. Catharines.General admission is $9 or $7 for members, plus tax. Memberships are available through the Film House website.<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span> read more

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No 10 Ohio State routs No 4 Michigan 6239

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Dwayne Haskins threw five touchdown passes, freshman Chris Olave scored twice and blocked a punt that was returned for a TD and No. 10 Ohio State continued its mastery over No. 4 Michigan with a record-setting 62-39 victory Saturday that sends the Buckeyes to the Big Ten championship game.The Wolverines were two victories away from their first conference championship since 2004 and a trip to the College Football Playoff, facing an Ohio State team that has looked discombobulated on defence and one-dimensional on offence much of the season. Looking to snap a six-game losing streak against the Buckeyes (11-1, 8-1, No. 10 CFP) and get coach Jim Harbaugh his first victory in four tries in the rivalry, the Wolverines (10-2, 8-1, No. 4 CFP) wilted.In the 115th meeting between two of college football’s most storied rivals, Ohio State scored more points than it ever had against Michigan — more points than any team has ever scored in regulation against Michigan. The previous high was 58 by Cornell in 1891.And now, despite all the dysfunction at Ohio State this season — both on and off the field — the Buckeyes will face No. 20 Northwestern next week in Indianapolis with a chance to repeat as Big Ten champs and maybe even squeeze into the playoff.NO. 5 GEORGIA 45, GEORGIA TECH 21ATHENS, Ga. (AP) — Jake Fromm threw four touchdown passes, D’Andre Swift ran for 105 yards and Georgia romped into the Southeastern Conference championship game.The Bulldogs (11-1, No. 5 CFP) couldn’t afford a slip-up, not with top-ranked Alabama looming next week in Atlanta.Georgia led 38-7 at halftime — which, in an interesting twist, was the score of last year’s dominating victory over the Yellow Jackets. The Bulldogs held a 343-66 edge in total yards, piling up 18 first downs to only four by Georgia Tech (7-5).Fromm threw a 5-yard touchdown pass to Riley Ridley, a 12-yarder to Jeremiah Holloman and a 44-yarder to Mercole Hardman. Swift chipped in with a 1-yard scoring run, Elijah Holyfield had an 8-yard TD and Rodrigo Blankenship completed the onslaught with a 25-yard field goal on the final play of the half. On Georgia’s first series of the second half, Fromm hooked up with Ridley again on a 4-yard scoring pass that prompted many in the crowd of more than 92,000 to head for the exits on a cold, damp day between the hedges.NO. 13 FLORIDA 41, FLORIDA STATE 14TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Feleipe Franks had three touchdown passes and No. 13 Florida used a punishing ground attack to end a five-game losing streak to Florida State.Lamical Perine had a 74-yard touchdown run, and Florida ran for 278 yards, averaging 5.3 yards per carry. Perine ran for 129 yards, averaging 9.9 yards per carry.The Gators (9-3) halted Florida State’s bowl streak, which began in 1982, and handed the Seminoles (5-7) their first losing season since 1976 — Bobby Bowden’s first season as coach.Franks, who grew up just 20 miles south of Doak Campbell Stadium in Crawfordville, completed 16 of 26 passes for 254 yards. He threw touchdown passes to Van Jefferson, Trevon Grimes and Josh Hammond. Grimes led the Gators with five receptions for 118 yards.NO. 19 SYRACUSE 42, BOSTON COLLEGE 21BOSTON (AP) — Eric Dungey ran for three touchdowns and threw for 362 yards and three more scores to lead Syracuse past Boston College.The Orange (9-3, 6-2 Atlantic Coast Conference) gave up the first score of the game, then scored touchdowns on three straight possessions, starting with a 75-yard pass from Dungey to a wide-open Sean Riley. BC fumbled the ensuing kickoff, setting up Dungey’s 4-yard run to make it 14-7 and the Eagles (7-5, 4-4) never got any closer.Dungey followed with a 2-yard touchdown run and also scored on an 18-yard quarterback sneak right before the half to give the Orange a 28-14 lead.Riley caught five passes for 115 yards, and Dontae Strickland carried 20 times for 129 yards for Syracuse.___More AP college football: https://apnews.com/tag/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25The Associated Press read more

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Labour support hits fiveyear low in opinion polls

first_imgTHE FIRST OPINION poll of the autumn has shown another drop in support for the Labour Party.Support for the minority coalition party is down 2 per cent to 10 per cent, the lowest level of support the party has enjoyed since October 2008.The Sunday Business Post/RedC poll, which will be published tomorrow, also shows support for Fine Gael down by one per cent to 27 per cent.Support for Fianna Fáil has climbed a point to 23 per cent, while Sinn Féin has registered no change at 17 per cent. Support for independents and others now accounts for 23 per cent, up two per cent.The poll also contains details of the likely votes in the upcoming Seanad referendum.Among likely voters, 50 per cent of people say that they will vote yes, 35 per cent say they will vote no and 15 per cent say they don’t know. Taking out those who don’t know, 59 per cent say they will vote to abolish the upper house and just 41 per cent will vote for retention.Like politics? Then why not ‘Like’ TheJournal.ie Politics on Facebook to keep up to date with all that’s happening in and outside of Leinster House.PICS: Pat Rabbitte has got a lightsaber and he’s not afraid to use itRead: ‘Bogus’ and ‘populist’: The opposition’s take on Dáil reform planlast_img read more

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The iPhone 5 concept Apple would love to make

first_imgIt’s not going to be long now before speculation about the iPhone 5 kicks into high gear. A launch is expected before the year is over, and we are already expecting a larger display, a thinner phone, and a new, smaller dock connector. Other than that, it’s unlikely Apple will change much. Why would they when the iPhone is so recognizable and popular?But Apple always likes to push the boundaries and raise our expectations ever higher–just look at what they did to the MacBook Pro display last week. So if they could surprise everyone with an unexpected feature, and it made the phone stand out next to the competition, you bet it would make the final design.The concept video above, created by Adney Films, will certainly turn a few heads if it gets played for the iPhone design team. Apple is always trying to be minimalist in the design decisions it takes, and what’s more minimalist than a display that’s completely clear?I think we can all agree that the iPhone 5 is going to look nothing like the piece of hardware shown off in this video. It’s way too thin for today’s components to fit inside, and there’s no way to create a completely clear smartphone even if clear batteries may be coming along soon. But you have to add the word “yet” on to the end of those statements.Apple is leading the way in gadget design, and in particular glass manufacturing. It wasn’t by accident that they managed to get the screen on the new MacBook Pro with Retina Display down to just 7mm thick.If Jonathan Ive could make the display, and therefore the iPhone completely transparent, would he? I suspect so, and I’d put money on Apple achieving such a breakthrough before anyone else. As for when it arrives, we could be waiting for the iPhone 8 or 9 to be pulled out of Tim Cook’s pocket on stage a few years from now.last_img read more

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Google Nexus 7 Tablet confirmed by Asus exec

first_imgWhile we can’t say for sure whether the Nexus 7 tablet will look like the image we saw two days ago — or even whether the leaked hardware specs were on target — we do know this. Google is definitely releasing a tablet, and Asus is helping them bring it to market. How do we know? Because an Asus executive confirmed as much to Reuters.The unnamed exec also confirmed that the tablet was built to take on the Kindle Fire, which certainly makes sense. It’s not exactly an ideal scenario for Google that the best-selling Android-based tablet on the market ships with a third-party app store and none of their default apps installed. With a Nexus tablet on offer, Google is no doubt hoping to lead the way for their other OEM partners and show them that it’s possible to build a successful Android tablet. All it takes is the right mix of hardware, software, and, of course, a competitive price.It’s a strategy that worked for Android phones, with the original G1 paving the way. It’s also the same strategy Microsoft is employing with the Surface, though they’ve chosen to go after a more difficult target: the iPad.For Google, however, kickstarting the next generation of Android tablets with a lower-cost device is the most logical move — the Kindle Fire has proven that people want an alternative tablet that doesn’t command the iPad premium. It’s also a move that can yield big returns down the road as users make purchases from Google Play and sign on for additional storage for their Google Drive accounts.More at Reuterslast_img read more

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Anglers cashed in on pikeminnow rewards

first_imgMore than 225,000 northern pikeminnow were caught in the Columbia River basin this year as part of the sport-reward program, with the top angler catching 14,019 fish and earning $119,341.The program pays a bounty $5 to $8 per pikeminnow that is 9 inches or longer caught in the Columbia and Snake rivers from May through September. Based on studies in 1983-90 in the John Day reservoir, pikeminnow accounted for 78 percent of predation on young downstream-migrating salmon and steelhead.The Bonneville Power Administration’s Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward program paid out more than $1.76 million this year.Steve Williams, the pikeminnow program manager with Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, said the goal is to reduce larger members of the pikeminnow population by 10 percent to 20 percent. This year’s exploitation rate has been about 11.9 percent.Overall, the program to remove pikeminnow from the Columbia River costs BPA $3 million to $4 million each year.Two of the program’s registration stations were in Clark County. At Ridgefield Marina, 6,706 pikeminnow were turned in for an average catch per trip of 10.7 fish. At the Port of Camas-Washougal boat ramp, 14,014 pikeminnow were brought in for an average catch of 9.7 per trip.last_img read more

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New chief appointed for Miami Police Department

New chief appointed for Miami Police Department

first_imgMIAMI (WSVN) – The Miami Police Department’s newly appointed chief is on a mission to reduce gun violence.Jorge Colina was officially appointed as chief of the department by the city manager, Thursday.The 28-year veteran was promoted from assistant chief.Colina will take the reigns later in January and already has specific goals in mind.“Reducing gun violence is going to be our number one top priority,” he said. “Drugs and the opiod epidemic are things we need to address, and we will, but I have faith that we can do everything we set our hearts and minds to.”Colina replaces Rodolfo Llanes, who is set to retire in March.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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Pedestrian hit by Brightline train in Fort Lauderdale

Pedestrian hit by Brightline train in Fort Lauderdale

first_imgFORT LAUDERDALE, FLA. (WSVN) – A pedestrian was transported to a hospital after he was struck by a Brightline train, Friday night.Fort Lauderdale Police and Fire Rescue responded to the scene in the area of Northeast Third Avenue and North Flagler Drive at around 8 p.m.According to police, the man had attempted to cross the tracks.The train stopped, and the pedestrian was taken to Broward Health Medical with injuries that were not life-threatening, according to officials.The accident takes place two days after a bicyclist was killed in Boynton Beach, Wednesday, while trying to pedal around the gates, which were down at the time.The Friday before, a 32-year-old woman was struck and killed in Boynton Beach as the train did a preview event.Authorities spoke about the importance of safety around the trains, Friday, in light of the recent incidents. “We’re going to place safety ambassadors. We’re going to place individuals at the busiest intersections, up and down the corridor, to reinforce the need,” said Patrick Goddard, president and CEO of Brightline,” and to communicate obeying the traffic signals and signage that we have placed in the corridor.”Authorities are still investigating the Fort Lauderdale incident.Brightline trains have since resumed service.Please check back on WSVN.com and 7News for more details on this developing story.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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India a great destination for building digital economy infrastructure Payoneer CEO Scott

first_img[Representational Image]PexelsThe world is shifting towards digital economy and it is changing countries and people across the globe. Digital transformation is altering the way organisations work and is contributing in reshaping the global economy altogether.Digital transformation has also changed the modes of payment globally making it easy, cashless and hassle-free. India is seen as one of the top markets for digital economy as it is ranked fourth in in terms of active Internet users across the world. The Indian government is also gearing towards digitisation of the country and has  launched initiatives to pave way for a cashless society through its varied schemes like Aadhar Pay.The Indian government recently announced that it will be banning cash transactions of  greater than Rs 3,00,000 (UK£3600 or US$4500), in the 2017-18 Budget which focuses on boosting the digital economy and rural growth. The move is designed to shift paymnent methods in India to a virtual and digitised system and making the country a global market for firms across nations.Payoneer’s CEO Scott Galit speaks with International Business Times- India edition about India’s potential of being a fast-growing digital market and the company’s future plans with the nation. Payoneer is a leading financial services business which provides online money transfer and e-commerce payment services: Payoneer CEO Scott GalitWhat kind of potential do you see in India for your business and its role in global digital economy today and why?India has shown strong growth in both the export of goods and services in the recent past. The country has a large population and a budding market of entrepreneurs. Today, we have over a million merchants selling goods like handicraft, leather products, jewellery, apparel and home products. India is also one of the biggest ICT service exporters. In fact, 30 per cent of India’s export is software and services. With more than 1.5 crore freelancers; it is estimated that we bring in about 40 per cent of global freelancing business. Our products and offerings are customised to help each of these segments get paid from their global clients in a fast, easy and low-cost way.When did you launch your operations in India and how has been the response so far?We have had our licenses in India since mid-2015. Businesses in India are very enterprising and they found us online even before we had a local presence. Our office in India opened in August of 2016 to support and grow the services for our Indian customers.What are the trends you have analyzed when it comes to transactions by Indians and how different are they from the rest of the world?India is unique in that the export of both goods and services are growing at a fast pace. Typically, other emerging geographies focus on just one of these segments. Because of this span, we get various customer requests for their cross-border transactions. For example, our platform plays a role in building parity between small developers and enterprise companies as far as speed and costs of processing payments are concerned. This allows the developer to have similar cost structures and compete with the large organisations. Similarly, we enable small goods exporters to get their tax refunds by helping them identify and complete the needed documentation.Do you foresee entry of more global players eyeing India in the context of gradual shift to digital economy?In our opinion, the shift to digital is not gradual and businesses are adopting it at very fast pace. Our focus is to help these businesses embrace this shift, and to grow and compete on a global scale. We channel our efforts in driving this transformation rather than worrying about our competition.What do you think is crucial to a successful switch from cash economy to digital?Some key factors for a successful switch from cash to digital are: a) transparency – for example we disclose our pricing upfront. In contrast, with many other players and banks, the foreign exchange conversion rates are mostly unknown to the person receiving the funds, and b) trust and expertise – as a company, we have focused exclusively on cross-border B2B transactions. This has helped us develop strong machine learning profiles that help us do faster approvals and disbursal, to make sure the digital economy can move as fluidly as the cash economy. And finally, c) awareness – as we speak, we are preparing to outreach into tier 2 and tier 3 towns in India as that’s where the transformations have been slowest.In a country like India where only 26 per cent of Indian population has access to internet, how do you think digital economy will progress here?Though only 26 per cent of the India population has access to the Internet, it’s important to keep in mind two things. First, in terms of the number of Internet users, India still ranks fourth in the world, so the number of participants in the digital economy is massive. The relatively low penetration percentage promises a huge potential for growth to come. Second, I think this statistic would grow quite a bit if we were just looking at businesses. Anecdotally, I haven’t come across a single business or entrepreneur in the cities or in the rural areas of India who does not have a smart phone. Our focus will be to tailor our services to every kind of user. For example, we may have to create vernacular language versions of our content. But Internet access is not something we lose sleep over. We believe the transformation there is well underway.Won’t vulnerability to data theft discourage consumers from using digital modes of payment, especially in countries like India?Unfortunately, cyber theft is as inevitable of a risk for digital economies as regular theft is for cash. Just as we must all take some steps to protect ourselves from pickpockets and scammers, we must take digital precautions as well. The key is to do business with payment providers you trust, that have a reputation for security and honesty. Payoneer is a risk company at heart, and one of the most regulated and trusted fintech companies globally. Our backbone is a strong and secure platform for transactions, customer data and any information that changes hands.What is your revenue model? Apart from charging customers for transactions done, Is there any other source of income for you?Our belief is that we should focus on creating more value for our customers and act as their partner for growth, and that this in turn will expand Payoneer’s network of users and ultimately lead to our success as well. One such example are the free forums we host all over the world that bring in experts from various industries who help entrepreneurs learn more about how to grow and optimise their business. Payoneer is about empowering an SMB to grow their business, and payments is just one piece of the puzzle.With only 29 per cent women among the Internet users in India, how can more women be included in the digital workforce?I think an important first step is recognising just how wide the opportunities in the digital economy are. Many traditional jobs can bring success online, and the digital economy offers the added benefit of a flexible schedule. For many, a 9-5 workday can interfere with family life. Freelancers and entrepreneurs can work from the comfort of their own home, and during the hours that suit them. In addition, marketplaces are looking for a wide variety of entrepreneurs – translators, designers, photographers, craftmakers, and more. In short, almost anyone with a strong skill and a willingness to work hard can find success in the online economy.What are your plans for the current year? Anything specific for India?India is a priority for Payoneer and one of the key focus areas. We already have a local office and we want to be as close to our customers as possible. We are investing in driving awareness across India so that businesses can understand the benefits of digital and cross border. We are localising our products and offerings to suit the local demand.last_img read more

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City Agreement With HUD Will Bring About New Affordable Housing Policies

City Agreement With HUD Will Bring About New Affordable Housing Policies

first_img Share Houston is implementing new housing policies as part of a joint agreement with the federal government. This comes after an investigation by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, which found some of the city’s housing policies violated the Civil Rights Act.HUD initiated its investigation because the city refused to support the construction of a mixed-income apartment complex the Houston Housing Authority was proposing to build at the 2600 block of Fountain View Drive west of the Galleria shopping center. In a letter HUD sent to Mayor Sylvester Turner in January of last year, HUD’s investigation deemed the City was in noncompliance with title six of the Civil Rights Act because of possible discrimination on the basis of race or national origin.Residents of the area where the Houston Housing Authority wanted to build the apartment complex repeatedly complained about the project.Mayor Turner said his opposition was based on its cost, which was estimated at $56 million dollars for about 230 units — or around $240,000 per unit. Turner emphasized at the time that only 23 of the units — just 10 percent of the entire project– would be designated for families living below the poverty line.Tom McCasland is director of Houston’s Housing and Community Development Department. He tells Houston Matters producer Maggie Martin how the city is changing its policies going forward.last_img read more

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Local Artist Paula Whaley Found Voice Healing In Clay

Local Artist Paula Whaley Found Voice Healing In Clay

first_imgTwelve years ago, at age 58, sculptor and traditional doll maker Paula Whaley purchased a property near the intersection of North Charles and 21st streets. Her neighbors at the time consisted of a methadone clinic and boarded up houses. “Because I was from Harlem and I had gone through the ’50s with the whole heroin epidemic … this didn’t bother me,” said Whaley in a rare interview with the AFRO. More than her Harlem upbringing, however, it was something she learned from her brother, the late literary icon James Baldwin, which led to the purchase of what is now her home and studio – a willingness to face one’s fears and risk everything for the sake of the person one might become as a result. Baldwin’s passing in 1987 served as a wakeup call, putting Whaley on the path to finding and expressing her authentic self, and living out a fuller purpose through her art. Whaley had made a name for herself in the world of fashion, traveling the world with her own clothing line among other accomplishments. However, she had come to feel that her life needed to be about more than just clothes. “My life had to be more of a sharing and a giving,” said Whaley. “It could not just be about me.”While reeling from the loss of her brother, who, at 19 years her senior, had served as more of a father figure (their father died on the same July day Whaley was born), Whaley turned to the molding of clay at the behest of a sculptor-friend who thought it could help her process her grief.As Whaley shaped the clay, figures began to emerge. “What’s very interesting about it was I’m watching this and these faces are coming, but they were the faces of my brother,” said Whaley.Her brother’s face has never left her work. It is reflected in the eyes of the figures and dolls Whaley crafts. These eyes have become something of a signature, an instantly recognizable element of her work that often touches on the themes of ancestry and the way one carries the legacy of those who affected one’s life but have passed on. “When you talk about the loss and what’s gone, I had to start to realize that it’s not really gone,” said Whaley of what her art has taught her. Much as her purchase of the building on Charles Street was a revisiting of her past in Harlem, Whaley’s work preserves her connection to a past that lives on not only in the faces of her work, but in the very way her studio has become an open house for other artistic endeavors in Baltimore. In addition to serving as a gallery showcasing area artists, Whaley has opened her studio, named the Oneeki Design Studio, to Fanon Hill and Navasha Daya’s Youth Resiliency Institute, which uses the space to introduce children to the artistic process, and recently, to film an episode for a youth-directed video news program. The studio has become a place of surrender for Whaley. The she surrenders to her mission to share and give, honoring the legacy she inherited from the brother that raised her and from her mother, who tended over a home in Harlem that was always open to those in their community. “You can’t do someone else,” said Whaley of what her art and studio have come to represent. “Or you can’t follow everything to the letter like how we’re trained. You have to come out of that box and really be you. Your authentic self.” The Oneeki Design Studio is located at 2103 North Charles St. and is open to the public on Sundays, so visitors can see and purchase the works of Thomas and Helena Wise.last_img read more

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Exercising for 25 hours a week may slow Parkinsons

Exercising for 25 hours a week may slow Parkinsons

first_imgExercising for at least 150 minutes every week may improve mobility and quality of life in people with Parkinson’s disease, a new study claims.Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive condition that often results in mobility impairments and can lead to decreased health-related quality of life (HRQL) and death.There is evidence that physical activity can delay decline in PD patients.Researchers determined that that people who exercised regularly had significantly slower declines in HRQL and mobility over a two-year period. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”We found that people with Parkinson’s disease who maintained exercise 150 minutes per week had a smaller decline in quality of life and mobility over two years compared to people who did not exercise or exercised less,” said lead investigator Miriam R Rafferty, from Northwestern University in the US.”The smaller decline was significant for people who started the study as regular exercisers, as well as for people who started to exercise 150 minutes per week after their first study-related visit,” said Rafferty. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveIn the study, more than 3,400 participants provided data over two years, with infromation collected during at least three clinic visits.Although this study did not determine which type of exercise is best, it suggests that any type of exercise done with a “dose” of at least 150 minutes per week is better than not exercising.”People with PD should feel empowered to find the type of exercise they enjoy, even those with more advanced symptoms,” said Rafferty.The study was published in the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease.last_img read more

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Playa del Carmen government says it will review centro noise regulations

Playa del Carmen government says it will review centro noise regulations

first_imgPlaya del Carmen, Q.R. — The city of Playa del Carmen is reviewing noise regulations and closing hours of establishments in the city’s central tourist area.The Government of Solidarity along with the downtown business sector have agreed to review the decibel levels found in establishments located in the city’s tourist areas. The city says they will also be reviewing closing hours and security levels inside each.“Today we have to choose the type of tourism we want to attract to Playa del Carmen. By improving the services offered to tourism, those who value and love this city increases, and therefore, they recommend the city and return to it,” said mayor Christine Torres.She explained that this weekend, city officials will verify the operating hours of bars and nightclubs which states last call at 3:00 a.m., customers out by 4:00 a.m. and bar staff out by 5:00 a.m. She says officials will also check for the levels and types of security in place at each of the establishments.They will suggest additional security practices as well as soundproofing spaces or the proper placement of speakers to help alleviate external noise in the downtown center.In February of last year, residents and visitors to downtown Playa del Carmen requested the city do something about the noise levels with some residents reportedly recording noise of up to 110 decibels.Residents of Cozumel have also said that with the right wind, they can hear Playa del Carmen beach club noise on the island.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Study Raises Concerns About Timely FollowUp to Positive Mammogram for the Uninsured

Study Raises Concerns About Timely FollowUp to Positive Mammogram for the Uninsured

first_img News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more Related Content Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. News | Mammography | November 02, 2016 Study Raises Concerns About Timely Follow-Up to Positive Mammogram for the Uninsured North Carolina study reveals that women under age 65 with no insurance had 60 percent higher odds of not having recommended follow-up within 60 days Image courtesy of Imago Systems News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more November 2, 2016 — A study by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers has found that younger, uninsured women in North Carolina had higher odds of missing a 60-day window for getting follow-up after an abnormal mammogram, even though research underscores the importance of timely follow-up.In the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, researchers report that uninsured women under age 65 who received their mammogram at community screening clinics in North Carolina also were less likely to get follow-up within a year of a positive mammogram.“If we’re going to use mammography to screen women for breast cancer, we need to make sure that women with a positive result receive the needed follow-up care, regardless of her insurance,” said the study’s senior author Louise Henderson, Ph.D., a UNC Lineberger member and assistant professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Radiology and UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. “As expected, women without insurance may need more support to make sure they get timely follow-up care.”Approximately 40 million mammography exams are conducted in the United States each year. The U.S. Preventive Service Task Force, citing evidence that links mammography exams to reduction in breast cancer deaths, recommends women aged 50 to 74 years have a mammogram every other year. The American Cancer Society advises women to undergo annual screening starting at age 45, and that women between age 40 and 44 years should have the opportunity to begin annual screening as well.Previous studies have found that one in 10 mammograms require additional follow-up, although the majority do not result in cancer diagnosis. Another study found that a three-to-six-month delay to treatment from symptom onset was linked to larger tumor sizes at diagnosis, and lower survival.In their study, UNC Lineberger researchers wanted to know if insurance influenced how quickly patients were able to get a follow-up appointment after a positive mammogram. They analyzed data from the Carolina Mammography Registry, a collection of breast imaging information for patients who have gone to community radiology facilities – excluding academic centers — in North Carolina. They used data gathered between 1995 and 2010 for 43,026 women aged 40 years and older who had a positive screening mammogram.Their analysis found that women younger than age 65 with no insurance had 60 percent higher odds of not having follow-up within the recommended 60 days of a positive mammogram. Even after a year, they were still less likely to receive follow-up.In terms of overall numbers, 18 percent of women under age 65 without insurance did not get follow-up within 60 days, compared to 11 percent of women in that age group with private insurance.“We found there are women who aren’t getting follow-up after a positive screening mammogram, and we need to understand why so that we can determine what to do about it. It does seem to vary by insurance, based on some of the data that we present,” Henderson said. “While it is possible that women could have received care outside of the group of community clinics that participated in our study, we don’t know if this is the case.”There are resources available to help women gain access to mammograms through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, but Henderson said there could be a need for additional resources.“I think we found something that isn’t unexpected, but is unfortunate, and that is that women who are uninsured may have more trouble getting timely follow-up after an abnormal mammogram,” said study co-author Katherine Reeder-Hayes, M.D., MBA, a UNC Lineberger member and an assistant professor in the UNC School of Medicine. “We know that these are some of the same women who don’t have good access to care in other places in the cancer care continuum.”Danielle Durham, Ph.D., the study’s first author and a former graduate research assistant at the Carolina Mammography Registry, highlighted the need for more research to determine if any of the women in the study went for follow-up outside of the study’s catchment area.“It’s important to remember that this is a particular population of people who have sought care,” said Durham, who is now a Cancer Prevention Fellow at the National Cancer Institute. “It would be interesting to see if these trends would be replicated in other populations in the United States.”In addition to Durham, Henderson, and Reeder-Hayes, other study authors include Whitney R. Robinson, Sheila S. Lee, Stephanie B. Wheeler, J. Michael Bowling, and Andrew F. Olshan.The study was funded by the National Cancer Institute.For more information: www.cebp.aacrjournals.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more News | Colonoscopy Systems | August 06, 2019 Rise in Early Onset Colorectal Cancer Not Aligned With Screening Trends A new study finds that trends in colonoscopy rates did not fully align with the increase in colorectal cancer (CRC) in… read more News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 07, 2019 Contrast Use in First Transthoracic Echocardiogram for Heart Failure Reduces Repeat Testing Heart failure is the fourth most common cause for all admission to U.S. hospitals, and it is the most common reason for… read more last_img read more

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Unscreened Wagga flyers cause Sydney Airport evacuation

first_imgSydney Airport’s Qantas terminal was evacuated on Wednesday due to a security breach which saw 44 passengers of a QantasLink flight from Wagga Wagga allowed into the terminal despite not having passed through security.As security screening is not carried out in Wagga Wagga, passengers normally are bussed to Terminal 2 for screening, but, according to a Qantas spokesperson, on Wednesday the bus didn’t turn up and some passengers were allowed straight into Terminal 3. “This was a process error on Qantas’ part,” the Qantas spokesperson said.Terminal procedure requires an automatic evacuation if any unscreened passengers enter the “sterile area of the terminal” so that all passengers can be re-screened.  Wednesday’s evacuation took place at 2.25pm, re-screening commencing at 3.15pm and the terminal was back to normal operations by 4.00pm. “We apologise for the inconvenience caused,” the Qantas spokesperson said, as seven flights were delayed by up to one hour, adding the evacuation was a “necessary procedure”.“We take such incidents very seriously and are investigating how the breach was allowed to occur.”The breach reveals the poor quality of Australia’s aviation security procedures as there is scant pre-flight screening in a number of the country’s regional airports meaning security screening is done upon arrival into major airports, reported the Sydney Morning Herald. “Almost certainly there’ll be a report to relevant government agencies,” a Qantas spokesperson told the newspaper. Source = e-Travel Blackboard: G.Alast_img read more

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