Top Stories

Top Stories

first_img Top Stories Bridgewater suffered a serious knee injury in training camp before the 2016 season. He returned in limited action in Week 15 of 2017, throwing just two passes.Meanwhile, McCown is 38 and coming off a broken hand that ended his year with the New York Jets after Week 14.On Monday night, Schefter reported that Keenum was ready to sign a two-year deal with the Denver Broncos, becoming the first quarterback domino to fall this offseason. Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Free agent QB Kirk Cousins will have dinner with #Vikings coaches and other essential personnel tomorrow night, then visit the shiny new facility on Thursday, sources say.— Ian Rapoport (@RapSheet) March 13, 2018That puts the Arizona Cardinals behind the eight-ball in their search for a starting quarterback.They were expected to offer Cousins a contract that would guarantee him close to $90 million over the first three years, according the 98.7 FM Arizona’s Sports Station’s Mike Jurecki, but it appears Cousins might be ready to pull the trigger and join the Vikings.If Cousins likes Minnesota’s pitch, then Arizona would need to move forward by setting up meetings and physicals with a second-tier of quarterback options: Sam Bradford, Teddy Bridgewater and Josh McCown.Related LinksOther QB options for Cardinals include Bradford, Bridgewater, McCownReport: Cardinals’ OG target Andrew Norwell to sign with JaguarsBradford, 30, and Bridgewater, 25,  were attempting to return from injuries at the tail end of the 2017 season as their Vikings charged into the NFC Championship Game behind starter Case Keenum.Bradford enjoyed his best pro season in 2016, throwing for 3,877 yards, 20 touchdowns and five interceptions for the Vikings before he made only two appearances last year due to a knee injury.center_img Washington Redskins quarterback Kirk Cousins (8) reacts to wide receiver Andre Roberts’ touchdown during the second half of an NFL football game against the Seattle Seahawks in Landover, Md., Monday, Oct. 6, 2014. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky) Comments   Share   Quarterback Kirk Cousins will reportedly take his first free agency meeting with the Vikings, and it appears that might be the end of his free agency tour.Cousins plans to ink a three-year, fully-guaranteed deal, sources told ESPN’s Adam Schefter.The Vikings offered Cousins a three-year deal that pays $28 million annually, according to NFL Network’s Ian Rapoport, who added the team believes it will have a commitment from the quarterback by the end of his visit Thursday. Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

Read More

State Highlights Mass Legislation Could Undermine Health System Mergers Wash Gov Signs

first_imgState Highlights: Mass. Legislation Could Undermine Health System Mergers; Wash. Gov. Signs Law To Expand Database Of Health Care Prices News outlets examine health care issues in Massachusetts, Washington, Florida, Kansas, Missouri, California, Louisiana, Connecticut, Texas, New York, Indiana and Maryland. Miami Herald: State Leaders Look To Pass Mental Health Reform — In 2016 The Boston Globe: MassHealth On Massive Hunt To Verify Eligibility The hospital industry in Massachusetts is sharply divided on proposed legislation that could make it harder for health systems to continue the wave of mergers and acquisitions that have been altering the medical landscape. (Dayal McCluskey, 5/14) The Associated Press: NY Hospital Pays $19 Million To Settle Medicare Lawsuit Starting July 1, primary care physicians in Kansas may see patients who pay them a flat monthly fee without fearing that such agreements are subject to state insurance laws. Josh Umbehr, a doctor who runs a Wichita practice that has gained notoriety for practicing under the no-insurance “direct primary care” model, pushed the Legislature to pass a bill that specifies such plans are not health insurance. Gov. Sam Brownback announced last week he had signed the bill. (Marso, 5/14) This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. The Associated Press: CDC Study Of Indiana HIV Cases Shows Most Are Same Strain As they reviewed legislative issues affecting children, [Florida] lawmakers and state agency heads said this week they will push again in 2016 for two key bills that died in the abrupt end to this spring’s regular session. An overhaul of the state’s mental-health system and an upgrade of early-learning programs topped a list of legislative priorities at Wednesday’s meeting of the Florida Children and Youth Cabinet in Stuart. (Menzel, 5/15) Kansas Health Institute: Direct Primary Care Not Subject To State Insurance Regulation Under New Law Connecticut doctors and hospitals have received close to $300 million in federal funds to adopt and use electronic health records, but the state still lacks a way to ensure they can be shared quickly and easily among medical providers. (Levin Becker, 5/15) The Associated Press: Louisiana House Backs Ban On Abortions Based On Gender The national right-to-die group Final Exit Network was convicted Thursday of assisting in the suicide of a Minnesota woman, after a Baltimore doctor who helped lead the organization and was present for the woman’s death testified against the group. Jurors, who deliberated for about 90 minutes, also found the group guilty of interfering with a death scene. The group faces a maximum fine of $33,000. Sentencing was set for August. It was the first time Final Exit Network has been convicted for its actions. (5/14) Community Access is not a bed and breakfast, although it feels that way when you walk through its unmarked door off Second Avenue on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Also known as Parachute NYC, this quiet seven-bedroom facility is one of four publicly funded mental health centers in New York City (located in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx) that provide an alternative to hospital stays for people on the verge of a mental health crisis. Parachute’s respite centers have no medical staff, no medications, no locks or curfews and no mandatory activities. They are secure, welcoming places where people willingly go to escape pressure in their lives and talk to trained “peer professionals” who can relate to what guests are going through because they are recovering from mental illness themselves. (Vestal, 5/15) The most prominent measure hanging in the balance would reauthorize $3.6 billion of annual taxes on medical providers that are due to expire Sept. 30. An extension is necessary to avoid punching a large hole in Missouri’s $9.4 billion Medicaid health care program for low-income residents. If the reauthorization fails Friday, some legislators suggested that a special session would be needed to try again to pass the bill. (Lieb, 5/15) center_img The Connecticut Mirror: Can The State Build A Better System To Get Your Medical Records To Your Doctors? The Associated Press: Missouri Legislature Enters Final Day Of Session In Turmoil Supporters of greater transparency in health-care costs celebrated a victory Thursday with Gov. Jay Inslee’s signing of legislation that will expand a database of medical prices available to the public. The new law improves upon a measure passed last year that created the all-payer claims database by requiring for the first time that Washington insurance companies share their cost data. Previously the database had access only to limited price information. (Stiffler, 5/14) Louisiana would prohibit abortions based on gender under a bill that won overwhelming, bipartisan passage Thursday from the state House despite questions about whether provisions that allow for lawsuits and damage claims go too far. (DeSlatte, 5/14) Stateline: Keeping The Mentally Ill Out Of Hospitals Federal prosecutors say the Westchester Medical Center has settled a lawsuit that alleged it paid kickbacks for referrals and overcharged Medicare. The hospital in Valhalla agreed to pay nearly $19 million. The U.S. attorney’s office said the medical center helped open a cardiology practice specifically to generate referrals to the hospital, then maintained a financial relationship with the practice, violating kickback laws. (5/14) The Baltimore Sun: Right-To-Die Group Convicted Of Assisting In Minnesota Suicide Locate 1.2 million people. Find even the thousands of them who don’t speak English or don’t have a place to live. Get them to fill out a 26-page application. Process those forms. And get it done by the end of the year. (Freyer, 5/15) The Seattle Times: Inslee Signs Law That Sheds More Light On Medical Prices The Boston Globe: Hospital Industry Split Over Health Care Legislation The Baltimore Sun: University Of Maryland Medical System To Acquire Medicaid Manage Care Firm The University of Maryland Medical System is poised to enter the Medicaid and Medicare managed care market in the state with an agreement to acquire Riverside Health Inc. Timonium-based Riverside employs about 100 people and provides health coverage to 25,000 people enrolled in the Maryland HealthChoice program. (Cohn, 5/14) A genetic analysis of HIV samples taken from about half the people infected in the largest HIV outbreak in Indiana history shows nearly all of them have the same strain of the virus, a finding one health expert says is a sobering reminder of how rapidly HIV can spread among intravenous drug users. (5/14) last_img read more

Read More