Go back to the enewsletter After a successful 2018

Go back to the enewsletter After a successful 2018

first_imgGo back to the enewsletterAfter a successful 2018 program, organisers of the Luxperience travel show have announced the event will return to the International Convention Centre, Sydney, from 7–10 October 2019. Now in its eighth year, Luxperience remains at the forefront of the high-end experiential travel market, bringing together industry leaders for three days of inspiring, meaningful connections. In 2019, Luxperience attendees can expect an innovative program, new products, glittering events and insights into luxury travel trends.“After fine tuning our event within the Diversified Communications fold, we were delighted with the success of this year’s Luxperience,” said Michelle Papas, Event Director of Luxperience. “Each year we survey all attendees about their experiences at the show. The results for Luxperience 2018 were outstanding and demonstrate our commitment to year-on-year improvement.”In 2018 the Luxperience program was reimagined and enhanced to create what is now widely acknowledged as a must-attend event. With an expanded team, a new home and a revitalised events program, the seventh edition of Luxperience has set the standard for future events. Hundreds of exhibitors and buyer delegates from around the world, thousands of one-on-one meetings and millions of dollars worth of new business all come together in the only trade show of its kind in the South Pacific region.Key highlights from attendees:97% of buyers were satisfied with their experience96% of buyers are likely to recommend Luxperience91% of buyers are likely to return for Luxperience 201995% of exhibitors were satisfied with their experience91% of exhibitors are likely to recommend Luxperience84% of exhibitors are likely to return for Luxperience 2019Luxperience’s focus remains on building meaningful business opportunities and relationships and is currently seeking expressions of interest from suppliers of luxury and experiential travel. Premium travel specialists who service the needs of discerning clients are also being sought from around Australia and around the world.Businesses interested in exhibiting opportunities or attending as a buyer should email luxperience@divcom.net.au.More details to be released over the coming months.Go back to the enewsletterlast_img read more

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Has the FA finally seen the future

first_img As an ex-youth coach of 5 years experience of the joys of Sunday kids footie, I appreciated your satirical look at the FA’s plans. I recognised many of the stereotypes and even some of the “stock” phrases that you hear every Sunday morning/afternoon up and down the country.On a serious note, from my experience, the problem lies with the FA, first and foremost. The very first coaching badge I attended, I walked out on within 5 minutes of it starting. This was around 1998. The so called FA approved coach was advocating the use of the “bunny hop” as a warm up exercise.(This is where you squat on your haunches and spring up as high as you can and land back in a squat whilst progressing forwards.) In 1973, the Japan Karate Association, who administers Shotokan Karate banned the use of bunny hops in it’s warm ups and sent this information across the world. Bunny hops compress the cartilages so much, that irreparable damage is caused by them, even when the idiot FA coach suggested you place your hands on your knees and squeeze, to prevent this!!Fast forward on to 2003, when I was doing a Level 2 coaching certificate. I volunteered to take the warm up and virtually all of the coaches couldn’t cope and were completely knackered. They didn’t appreciate that you need to warm up head, neck, torso, arms, lower back, etc not only the legs. That was the same warm-up (derived from the head to toe karate warm-up) that my U14s did every training and every game. The stupid FA coach was advocating dynamic stretching (where you skip and move loosely and fling the limbs out in natural movements) but didn’t realise the need for static stretching. They still have these idiot coaches getting kids to stand with one foot slightly in front of the other to stretch calves and quads. The other one is where they grab their foot and pull it up towards the hamstring. That’s the only stretches they know! The FA need to look to other sports. Watch an athletics coach take his charges through their warm up. He/she will do a similar warm up to a top grade karate instructor. Head to toe, the routine includes flexibility, strength, mobility and balance. My boys only ever had third party inflicted injury and even then they came back quicker. My boys were hyper-fit, disciplined, and the warm up engendered team work and camaraderie. The FA coaches are light years behind other sports, but that’s just like the FA’s Head of Development and the rest of an out of touch organisation.If you can’t get the warm up right, what hope do the kids have on the pitch? I used to listen to some of the comments that other coaches and kids used to make about my team (before they got a whipping from us). They used to say things like “they’re like an army!” “Look, they don’t talk during warm-up!” “They move together in every exercise!” Discipline equals success, and without discipline you cannot sustain success in the long term. I liked to think that I was not teaching/coaching my boys football, but teaching them lessons in life. My mantra was “we are responsible for our own actions and we must take the consequences of them.” My team never swore, never cheated, had a boy booked or red carded and we used to sweep all before us. Kids do what they want to do, not what we make them do and if you give them discipline they can do anything. If you teach a kid a disciplined approach to warming up, they will not only have a disciplined approach to sport, but a disciplined approach to live. Success is in preparation and discipline gives you that preparation.The FA should get off their fat behinds and get themselves down to watch how athletics and real Karate (not the “I’m a 6th dan in Ninja-kickbox-weapons-deadly handed tiger-ru, and I’m only 25!” coaches conduct a warm up. The foundations of anything set the tone for the building. Strong foundations = lasting building. Any parents of boys/girls who want to play football: look at the way the coach interacts with the kids. Does he smoke around them? Does he tolerate bad language, bad behaviour? Does he believe in the worth of the individual? Does he communicate with the kids in the way they can understand? Does he use “playground games” to teach football principles? (Chain tig is a great way to teach communication and singular purpose and improve all over body agility!) Does that coach explain to you what he’s doing and why? It doesn’t matter whether the guy used to manage Arsenal reserves or has no badges at all. What matters is not his coaching/football knowledge, but the way he approaches coaching. I had boys travel a round trip of 130 miles to train and play football for me on a Sunday. It wasn’t because my team was good, or even I was knowldgeable, but because I instilled life skills in my boys. The parents and the boys who wanted to play football and learn were queuing up. That is what’s needed now in grass-roots footie, lessons in life. Andre5 Order by oldest 0 1 Share via Email @barneyronay Loading comments… Trouble loading? Twitter Share on Facebook 22 Mar 2008 17:50 Share on Twitter unthreaded Share on Pinterest Twitter Seagulljavea/StanbowlesYes I wondered if Barney was taking the piss. But then my wife pointed out to me that you cant take the piss out of shit. Reply 22 Mar 2008 17:44 All Share on Facebook Sportblog NivekD Share on LinkedIn Reply Reply Share on Messenger collapsed Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other Report Twitter Report Share on Twitter stanbowles Reply Share Facebook Has the FA finally seen the future? Threads collapsed 0 1 Email (optional) Share on Twitter Reuse this content,View all comments > | Pick 22 Mar 2008 10:44 Facebook Share on Facebook Reply Share Reply | Pick Share on Twitter 0 1 Report oldest Share Twitter Twitter are you? Share on Twitter Facebook Facebook Contact author Share on Twitter Twitter | Pick Report expanded Facebook Why is there an extraneous apostrophe in the headline for this piece at http://sport.guardian.co.uk/0,,488191,00.html? It’s ‘its’ not ‘it’s, isn’t it? 0 1 comment Made me laugh.Ta v. much. inmycave 22 Mar 2008 15:50 Share on Facebook Twitter | Pick newest Report 22 Mar 2008 17:18 comments (9)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Facebook Fri 21 Mar 2008 23.21 EDT Facebook Share | Pick recommendations 25 Are you taking the piss? Report 0 1 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Shares00 Share Share on Facebook Share on Facebook 0 1 Reply Twitter Sportblog Facebook Bluerdaddy Share 50 Pete, that was actually not mad at all. Good post. Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment This week the Football Association promised to splurge £200m on pepping up recreational football. The announcement was made at a press shindig at which, in the words of its website, the FA “unveiled its philosophy” for the grassroots game. These are exciting times for hanging about in the park kicking a poorly inflated plastic ball. Amateur football stands on the verge of its most expensive makeover since the distribution of 40,000 emergency jumpers for goalposts after the collapse of the textile industry during first world war. But what does £200m actually get you these days?New stuff to shoutAn FA report has already raised alarms about the quality of grassroots stuff being shouted on the grassroots touchline. “It’s a massive eye-opener,” confirmed an FA source, opening his massive eyes. Scriptwriters from the world of TV and film have been drafted in to review the material available. Proposals include phasing out staples such as “Send it” (replaced by “Rotate the apex of attack!”) and “Send it long” (replaced by “Gaz is on back stick!”). “Above all we need to care about the people involved,” explained one writer. “We need to really believe that Gaz is on back stick and to communicate that to the audience. Plus Sir Trevor wants to see much wider use of the word ‘tremendous’ at all levels.”Wikkid Freestyle Urban Socca Fresh, exciting scheme to bring football back to the streets or similar approved urban space. Two teams of “playas” attempt to score “goalzz” on an innovative roll-away three-a-side pitch with cheap wobbly plastic goals that break immediately. A unique youth-oriented experience that combines elements of beach futsal, break-dancing, text-messaging, riding a tiny BMX on the pavement and threatening commuters with the crossbar from a disused wobbly plastic goal.Bloke who says ‘OI! LEAVE IT!’Part of the FA’s blueprint is to improve behaviour by parents at junior matches. Studies show the only effective means of defusing violent incidents remains a man in an anorak shouting “Oi! No! Leave it!” at appropriate moments. Plans are in place to provide every junior league with at least the next best alternative, a middle-aged woman in moon boots who repeatedly hisses: “He ain’t worth it, Gav. Walk away.”Small boysAn FA review has identified the post-war decline in indigenous cheeky chaps dribbling tennis balls along the kerb as the single most significant factor in subsequent generations of English footballers being crap. Plans to release hundreds of farm-reared knobbly-kneed boys into their native environment have already been trialled in parts of the Thames Valley. Results have been mixed. “We might consider steering clear of the A40 High Wycombe interchange in future,” an FA source said. “And we can only apologise to motorists for the distressing scenes some may have witnessed.”Nothing to doSports scientists believe a fatal absence of what they call “nothing else to do” may be scuppering the development of home-grown players. “Studies of thriving talent pools in Africa and South America have revealed many youngsters there have high levels of ‘nothing else to do’ or ‘no real hope in life’ beyond getting really good at football,” said one researcher. The FA has already begun the process of importing vast quantities of “nothing to do” from traditionally rich areas such as Ukraine and St Albans for distribution in schools. “This initiative has become Sir Trevor’s personal mission,” said an insider. “In fact, not a day passes without him spending some time in his office exploring new ways of having nothing much to do.” Share on Twitter Soccer 22 Mar 2008 23:58 | Pick Share on Twitter Share 0 1 0 1 Share on WhatsApp Reply Report Nicely put. And as with the best comedy, with some scary grains of truths. 22 Mar 2008 19:22 Share on Twitter Twitter Seagulljavea Reply Comments 9 22 Mar 2008 19:44 madpete First published on Fri 21 Mar 2008 23.21 EDT Report Yes?Or then again, no? Report Facebook Reason (optional) smifee Barney Ronay 0 1 Soccer 22 Mar 2008 16:03 Share Topics | Pick Share via Email | Pick 100 Share on Facebook Share | Pick Share on Facebook oharamac Share on Twitter Share on Facebook View more comments Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp Report Show 25 Close report comment formlast_img read more

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